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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
11 Nov 2018 10:20 #4202

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Believe me,Devonshire Road is no better!

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
14 Nov 2018 19:05 #4206

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As already reported, at the recent Winchmore Hill ward forum Clare Rogers gave a presentation about the plans for the Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood on behalf of Better Streets for Enfield. Clare has now produced a written version of her presentation and uploaded it to the Better Streets website.

Clare writes that Better Streets for Enfield welcomes Enfield Council's goal of "creat[ing] an environment where walking and cycling are facilitated and seen as the preferred method of travel" and reducing car traffic through the area. Evidence that drivers are using this purely residential area as a cut-through or "rat run" was provided by an "origin-destination" survey carried out by the council in 2016. Automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) technology was used to identify the number of vehicles that were entering the area and then leaving it within a set number of seconds and to find the routes they were taking. The four routes through the area with the highest number of cars are shown on this map.



1: The Mall and Amberley Road, 2: Meadway and Greenway, 3: Meadway and Bourne Avenue, 4: Fox Lane and Old Park Road

More recently Better Streets have been doing some data collection themselves, this time using a good old-fashioned method - standing by the side of the road with a clipboard (backed up with video footage) noting down vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists. This doesn't show what routes through the area drivers are using, but it does provide a snapshot of levels of traffic along particular roads. Once the quieter neighbourhood measures are in place (the council say before Christmas) it will be possible to count traffic along the same roads at the same time of day and judge how effective the measures have proved.

Clare says that some of the vehicle counts were "shocking":

I stood on the Mall at morning rush hour last week and counted 540 vehicles passing through in an hour. That’s more than one car every 10 seconds. It also suggests that the Mall is carrying around 5,000 vehicles per day – a number you’d expect on a main road, not in a residential area.


Such heavy traffic creates noise, pollution and danger, deterring people from walking or cycling. Families who would prefer their children to walk to school instead drive, meaning that there is even more traffic - a vicious circle.



So why have we reached this situation where children no longer walk to school by themselves or play in the street?

It’s not just that there are more cars on our roads. The problem is that in the UK we treat our residential neighbourhoods as part of the main road network. As traffic has increased, many neighbourhood roads have become through routes for non-resident drivers. While other European countries (like the Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany) have redesigned neighbourhoods to make streets low in traffic and give priority back to people – with cars as ‘guests’ – the UK has yet to follow suit.


Clare says that the quieter neighbourhood measures might do the trick, but if it turns out that they don't make enough difference, Better Streets will be lobbying the council to trial a "low-traffic neighbourhood". By creating barriers to cars at selected junctions (but allowing people on foot or on bike through),

The result is that anyone can drive to and from any street in the area, but no one can drive through the area.


The trial low-traffic neighbourhood could be created by putting two planters across the selected junctions. If there are problems, the trial could be reconfigured simply by moving the planters.

Clare points out how successful low-traffic neighbourhoods have proved in Walthamstow:

You can even hear birds singing. Walking and cycling rates have gone through the roof and families can cycle safely to school. People are taking pride in tending their front gardens. And once again, children are playing in the street.


You can read Clare's full article at betterstreets.co.uk/could-the-fox-lane-area-be-a-low-traffic-neighbourhood .

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
19 Nov 2018 17:27 #4210

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I asked Councillor Dinah Barry about the figures used for the Fox Lane area quiet neighbourhood.
The reply she got from David Cowan is as follows:

A summary of all the traffic data will be going on the website in table form in the next few days so that residents can see the overall figures and we will update it as we monitor it further in the coming months. New speed surveys are being carried out this week and next on all roads in the area as well and this information will be added as soon as we receive the results.

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
20 Nov 2018 09:47 #4211

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Didn't some wazzock cut the cables last time they tried speed/traffic surveys on the Lakes?

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
20 Nov 2018 16:47 #4212

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The council has uploaded a revised map that shows planters at the Aldermans Hill end of Lakeside Road, Grovelands Road and Old Park Road. The new link is cycleenfield.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Quieter-Neighbourhoods-Fox-lane-engagement-construction-2.pdf

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
20 Nov 2018 20:32 #4213

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Is there any significance behind, "To further improve road safety for pedestrians near the school we are
proposing to install sinusoidal speed humps on Fox Lane."
This stopped being a school half a lifetime since and it makes me wonder about the safety of pedestrians other than near the school, on Fox Lane as well as elsewhere in the area under consideration.
i ask, because I recall a previous exercise -which ended up not being delivered - which included a LBE plan for a zebra crossing across Fox Lane where the footpath (ref # 207) emerges from the garages to the south of the old school building. And that highlighted the risk of sitting behind a desk far away and trying to draw up a scheme. It would almost certainly have been the UK's least used zebra crossing.

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
22 Nov 2018 14:45 #4219

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Planters on Eversley Gardens? That is on the W9 bus route. Why on earth would you do that?

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Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood: More details
26 Nov 2018 15:39 #4233

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Just saw the raised beds at either end of Selborne Road, blocking half the road off,and wondered...

Come Tuesday, how on earth will the dustbin lorry get past to collect the rubbish ?

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