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TOPIC: Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic'

Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 05 Jun 2019 23:23 #4573

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[Original article]

planters at end of old park road

Planters at one end of Old Park Road. Data collected in May showed that traffic along this street had actually increased since the planters were installed.

Enfield Council is to end the trial placement of large planters at road junctions in the Fox Lane area because traffic count data collected in May this year shows that the planters are not achieving their intended objective of reducing through traffic. Before trialling an alternative method of reducing through traffic, the council will ask residents to comment on its ideas.  There will be a chance to do so at the Fox Lane & District Residents Association open meeting on 12th June.

The news that the trial is being abandoned was published on Monday on the Cycle Enfield website, along with a table comparing summary data collected in November/December 2018 ("baseline data" with the May counts ("interim data").  While in some streets off Fox Lane traffic volumes in the "worst hour" of the day were down somewhat, there were many streets where they had increased, in some cases by a significant amount - for instance, 594 vehicles drove along Old Park Road during its worst hour (8am), a 36 per cent increase.

[If the table below does not display properly and to read the explanation of the speeds shown in the table (the 85th quartile speed), please click here for a pop-out version.]

 

Baseline Data

Interim Monitoring

Percentage Change

Road Name

Speed data
(direction)

Volume

Speed Data
(direction)

Volume

Speed Data
(direction)

Volume

 

N/E

S/W

Total

Time

N/E

S/W

Total

Time

N/E

S/W

Total

Amberley Road

26.2

26.3

402

8am

23.4

24.8

397

8am

↓10.7%

↓5.7%

↓1.2%

Bourne Avenue

33.7

32.6

272

8am

32

32.1

262

8am

↓5.0%

↓1.5%

↓3.7%

Burford Gardens

30.1

28.7

106

4pm

29.7

28.9

106

5pm

↓1.3%

↑0.7%

↑0.0%

Cannon Road

 

 

 

 

18.4

18.7

62

8am

N/A

N/A

N/A

Caversham Avenue

29

31

183

8am

30.6

32.8

228

8am

↑5.5%

↑5.8%

↑24.6%

Conway Road

25.7

25.3

88

8am

28

27.8

114

8am

↑8.9%

↑9.9%

↑29.5%

Cranley Gardens

30.4

27.9

75

1pm

29.6

30.9

73

1pm

↓2.6%

↑10.8%

↓2.7%

Derwent Road

27.8

30.3

100

12pm

30.9

31.5

96

11am

↑11.2%

↑4.0%

↓4.0%

Devonshire Road

30

 

117

6pm

27.8

 

100

7pm

↓7.3%

N/A

↓14.5%

Fox Lane

28.9

24.5

548

8am

29

30.2

594

5pm

↑0.3%

↑23.3%

↑8.4%

Greenway

30.4

29

154

8am

31.1

30.7

171

8am

↑2.3%

↑5.9%

↑11.0%

Grovelands Road

29.5

29.6

140

4pm

29.6

29.6

172

8am

↑0.3%

↑0.0%

↑22.9%

Harlech Road

27.7

27.7

66

3pm

27.2

27.9

44

3pm

↓1.8%

↑0.7%

↓33.3%

Lakeside Road

27.5

32.2

117

12pm

31.5

31.4

103

5pm

↑14.5%

↓2.5%

↓12.0%

Meadway

29.7

29.6

419

8am

31.5

30

301

8am

↑6.1%

↑1.4%

↓28.2%

Oakfield Road

18.8

17.8

46

12pm

18.2

17.1

53

8am

↓3.2%

↓3.9%

↑15.2%

Old Park Road

29.3

26.2

303

8am

30.2

30

413

8am

↑3.1%

↑14.5%

↑36.3%

Parkway

26.2

24.6

59

8am

26.1

24.4

37

8am

↓0.4%

↓0.8%

↓37.3%

Selborne Road

25.5

23.8

249

8am

23

23.8

216

8am

↓9.8%

↑0.0%

↓13.3%

St George’s Road

29.4

30

153

8am

30.4

25.2

181

8am

↑3.4%

↓16.0%

↑18.3%

The Mall

20.5

20.2

368

4pm

21.7

21.4

419

5pm

↑5.9%

↑5.9%

↑13.9%

Ridgeway

15.9

19

31

9am

19.7

19.9

26

5pm

↑23.9%

↑4.7%

↓16.1%

Ulleswater Road

30.3

30.5

79

8am

43.7

26.3

106

5pm

↑44.2%

↓13.8%

↑34.2

The news that the planters are not deterring rat running is unsurprising.  They only create a short hold-up for people entering the street, and some residents have surmised that drivers might even go faster once in the street to make up for the "lost" seconds.  Certainly, the incidents where planters have been vandalised or moved around suggest that some drivers not only fail to respect the desire of residents for quieter streets, but are actively contemptuous of it.

The council have committed to listening to people's ideas and taking their views into consideration:

We will shortly publish some ideas for an alternative approach for the Fox Lane area using our engagement hub, Let’s Talk Transport which will allow residents to provide their initial thoughts on these ideas (we will collect information to understand whether responses are from residents living in the area or outside). The Council can then review this feedback and consider the next steps. Any implementation that is taken forward will once again be on a trial basis, providing opportunity to re-consider depending upon the evidence of data collected throughout this further trial, along with the views of residents living within the area.

Once the ideas for an alternative approach are published online, all households and businesses within the area will receive a flyer to provide an update and inform them of how they can contribute their feedback and invite them to a community event where they can discuss the ideas with Council Officers.

Local group Better Streets for Enfield are proposing a "low-traffic neighbourhood" scheme and have come up with a draft design.  This involves using point closures (also referred to as "filters" because they let through people on foot or on bikes) to stop off one end of a road to prevent cars using it as a through route.  Their draft scheme has eleven "filters", which are easily created using bollards (or re-purposed planters).  Cars would be able to access every address in the Fox Lane area, but to leave the area they would have to return the way they came.  Some streets in the neighbourhood would be accessible from Aldermans Hill or Cannon HIll, others from Bourne Hill or The Bourne.

fox lane low traffic neighbourhood proposalThe eleven point closures that would create a low-traffic neighbourhood

Better Streets say that a "filtered" scheme is ideal for trialling, as bollards or other obstacles can be installed, moved around or removed quickly and cheaply.

If you live in the Fox Lane quieter neighbourhood area, there will be a chance to find out more about what the council intends doing at the next open meeting of Fox Lane & District Residents Association, which will be held in the Burford Hall at 7.45 on Wednesday 12th June.  The guest speaker will be Richard Eason from the council team that is running the Quieter Neighbourhoods programme.

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 06 Jun 2019 15:17 #4574

I am surprised to see that the introduction of speed bumps resulted in a significant INCREASE in speed. That one is unexpected.

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 08 Jun 2019 12:40 #4579

Worth mentioning the cost involved for the planters was over £13,000. This was given by the council under a Freedom of Information request in February. If the scheme had been fully implemented it would have cost more than £30,000 based on a unit cost of £1030. Plus the cost of the speed bumps, that is a substantial amount. I do agree with Karl Brown that the speed bumps should have been more effective. Maybe the combination of both caused a lot of bad driving. I think the speed bumps on their own should have been a sufficient deterrent. Would be interesting to see how speeds are after removal of the planters but with the speed tables still in place.

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 09 Jun 2019 17:59 #4581

An earlier posting includes, “I think the speed bumps on their own should have been a sufficient deterrent”. Best part of 20 years and I suppose 5 administrations ago, the then ruling Conservatives first intended speed bumps on Fox Lane, presumably believing exactly that same assumption, but instead opted for a wider all Fox Lane area approach, something which they later rejected despite available, approved grant funding and instead installed three VAS’s on Fox Lane. Move on a few years and they then suggested planters at the ends of the streets, and then lost power.
So now we’ve seen their ideas in action, and they seem not to work, but the very long running issue of residential streets being used by large numbers of speeding drivers remains. Indeed, I would suggest a minority of those are now exhibiting really appalling driving behaviour, perhaps as engine power goes up at the same time as police numbers go down.
It appears we’re now on the cusp of something new. Top whack £13000 or so for a pilot to hopefully lance what has been an issue for call it two decades, and where we are now seeing the authorities rebalancing the power between drivers and the rest so more radical outlooks are required, may not seem such a bad investment in the round.
and surely the planters will have a use somewhere for something visually attractive.

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 10 Jun 2019 18:09 #4586

Correct me if I am wrong please. All the planters have done is to move traffic to other roads. People need to get from A-B, so there is no reduction in overall traffic.

The latest idea seems to mean: Drivers will be able to drive into a street, but will have to do a Uturn or similar to get back out,,,is that really a safe suggestion?.
As for the speed of traffic, my local street applied for some sort of speed reduction action, the Council's response was, as there had been no injuries in the street there was no need for it, despite cars etc speeding up to 50 mph.

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 10 Jun 2019 20:58 #4588

The Council's traffic monitoring figures show that the planters haven't moved traffic to other roads - in fact in several roads with planters traffic volume and speed have increased. Experience in other areas show that the only way to deter rat-running traffic (and the associated danger, pollution and noise) from residential streets is to prevent that traffic with physical barriers. I'd much rather that a handful of residents' vehicles do a three-point turn in my street than have the 400 vehicles an hour, many speeding, weaving in and out. Experience elsewhere also shows these measures reduce total amounts of traffic - more people walk and cycle.
The following user(s) said Thank You: John Phillips

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 11 Jun 2019 09:58 #4589

The Councils reaction to Peter Caskey’s request seems to be old world authority thinking in its approach (albeit noting he doesn’t state a “when”). Traffic related injuries to pedestrians on individual residential streets are fortunately rare while car on car bumps tend to converge on junctions but it’s the long assumed low impact of traffic volumes and the “50mph” speeders he mentions which do the incessant damage to local community, public health and the general freedoms of the many. That’s where the Mayors Healthy Streets and the emerging London Plan are centred - and hence Enfield needs to be - and about time too.
What still sticks with me is the chart in the original Mini Holland bid which, by memory, showed something like two thirds of all car journeys in Enfield were less than 5km – effectively walking distance. Eat into a slice of that and the volume issue at least all but goes away. Currently that’s a personal choice but is increasingly being “encouraged”.

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Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through traffic' 11 Jun 2019 23:29 #4590

I was very struck by Peter Caskey’s bewilderment about the trial of planters on the Lakes Estate to reduce traffic speed/encourage drivers to take a route away from residential streets/use public transport/walk or cycle. As he says people do have to get from A to B, but there are lots of ways of doing it which don’t blight the lives of residents generally and kids especially. Basically car drivers should use main roads rather than residential streets apart from any departure/arrival points which are in residential areas.

But of course main roads are generally slow these days especially at peak periods. Which I think is a good incentive to walk, cycle or take public transport.

Time now to introduce a good mantra: residential streets are for living, not driving along.

On Peter C’s complaint about his Council’s response to a request for reduced speed I have a lot of sympathy. Speeding is antisocial anywhere in town or city, and especially in residential streets where kids should be able to socialize/walk or cycle to school from an early age. But Council’s must be consistent in their decisions.

Unfortunately most drivers seem to have acquired a ‘sense of entitlement’ to right of way and speed which mitigates against Council's best intentions.
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