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    • Festival 2019
    • The exhibition of human monstrosities is STRICTLY PROHIBITED, so says part of requirement clause 44 in one of Festival’s many approval letters. But as always, everyone will be welcome, so even if you don’t like what you see in the mirror on Sunday 1st September, come along anyway - just don’t make an exhibition of yourself. Our Premises License saga ticks along and all official Notices are now down from the park boundary (only 2 of 40 part vandalised in 28 days); the near £500 for our Occasional Sales License is paid and the Council are assessing the associated stall layout plan; £400 for insurance goes out next week; we’ve paid the DTI air wave license fee, and so on. Not a great cash flow situation so muchus thanks to the volunteer team at The Palmers Greenery Cafe who are diverting some profits to supply safety kit we need for Festival 2019. There’ll be more on that another time. We’re experiencing a high level of requests to take part on the pop-up stage which proved a big success in its trial last year. If we have a budding entertainment manager out there, or someone who simply wants to do a little bit of coordinating to bring it all together, then there’s a...
    • In Other Subjects / Community Groups and Community Events
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 17 Apr 2019 14:43
    • Sign before 10th April to safeguard the Pinkham Wa...
    • 2,184 (two thousand one hundred and eighty four) residents chose to counter sign the representation put forward by the PWA yesterday to the Regulation 19 North London Waste Plan (NLWP). If even a minority choose to turn up at the public inquiry, currently expected in the autumn, it will make for a very full-house. Tightly argued from many fronts across its 103 pages it is hard to see there being much of a case, if any at all, to include the Pinkham Way site in the NLWP. I’m sure a copy will be available on the PWA web site soon for those looking for useful bedtime reading. Mind you, not everyone sees things this way, not least the sites planning authority – Haringey borough. Attached is a note providing comments from their web site after their Cabinet overturned the recommendation of their own Regulatory Committee and agreed to include the site in the NLWP. Some headlines from what they state on their web: “of some local nature conservation value” – The site was made a Grade 2 Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (SINC) in 1979, upgraded to Grade 1 in 1988, and is seen by Natural England as being of Metropolitan Importance, a category classed in the London...
    • In Planning and Development / Pinkham Way
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 13 Apr 2019 14:08
    • Traffic count data reveals high incidence of speed...
    • There’ll naturally be an intent to wait until all planters are in and the subsequent data is analysed but experience so far of Old Park Road and Fox Lane suggests the impact of changes so far on either the volume or velocity of traffic has been completely ineffective. That appears to be a widely held view, at least in this street. Perception does suggest that the very largest rat-running wagons are down in number - but certainly not small and mid-sized vans. My cycling experiment (PG to Southgate) ended last year when I concluded the risks were simply too great. I see nothing to have changed that view since the installations. The bike remains back in the shed. As part of the schemes assessment it’ll be interesting to hear exactly what the objective(s) of success was to be set against.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 09 Apr 2019 16:47
    • Stories from the carriageway
    • There it was, bold-as-brass on page 4 of the Opinion section of the 7th March edition of ‘The Guardian’, an article titled “Cars ruin our lives. Within 10 years we must phase them out.” It was written by George Monbiot, a regular contributor who is regarded by many to be something of an environmental firebrand. And the title did sound a bit over the top, even to someone like me who has rarely owned a car, and just as rarely has driven more than 3000 kilometres a year. But it soon became clear that George M didn’t mean that all cars should be taken off the roads, only 90% over the next 10 years. In fact he acknowledged that cars have their uses, but suggests that rather than being good servants they have become bad masters, spoiling everything they touch. Beginning with poor air quality which kills three times as many people worldwide as Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria combined, whilst, according to a recent ‘paper’, fossil fuels like petrol, and particularly diesel, are the most significant threat to children’s health. Next he tackles the question of pedestrians killed by cars; killing which since 2009 has risen by 11% (in the US by 51%), apparently due...
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Road Traffic
    • Author David Hughes
    • 09 Apr 2019 15:19
    • Traffic count data reveals high incidence of speed...
    • I was walking up Fox Lane on Thursday, around 6pm, and had gone through the corrugated iron tunnel and was almost at Old Park Road. There was a car heading towards Green Lane at a normal speed when another car came down Fox Lane at high speed, passed the first car by going on the wrong side of the traffic island, heading straight for the bridge at 50 or 60mph on the wrong side of the road, he couldn't possibly have known whether anyone was coming up from Green Lanes. I'm generally opposed to capital punishment, but I think that going the wrong side of a traffic island should be a hanging offence.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Basil Clarke
    • 07 Apr 2019 19:49
    • New trains - next week?
    • In last night’s total timetable carnage (start of a significant holiday week and presumably absolutely no margin in driver numbers so as to maximise profits irrespective of collateral damage to mere users), round the corner tootled a new train. So to add to Denis’ thesis I’d add: very bright headlights, priority seats with covers different to standard seats, a fire extinguisher under a seat near the door (useful for fires, or as often happened back at school, to make someone’s clothing all wet and foamy), a small red light above the doors so you know where they are in the dark and a very beepy door closing beeper. The journey seemed quieter, beeper aside. Just wish there was enough drivers to run the timetabled service.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 06 Apr 2019 13:18
    • New trains - next week?
    • I thought no announcements nor any screens was an absolute pain! Winter peak time travel, with the windows opaque with condensation, it was impossible to know where along the line you were unless stood in eyeshot of the opening doors on constantly checking google maps on your phone. Interesting feedback on this forum vis a vis many others I've seen where commuters seem delighted for all the additional room. Plugs another added 21st century bonus.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author David Eden
    • 05 Apr 2019 15:24
    • Traffic count data reveals high incidence of speed...
    • It's a great we have some lovely parks close by, though many parents would hesitate before sending their children there on their own. One of the best things about living in Old Park Road is the wonderful atmosphere when the street is closed - the annual Street Party, the Car-free day and the other Sunday play days. The road is traffic free - and therefore engine noise, fume and danger free; adults and children alike can use the space between their houses for living - talking, playing, eating, drinking and socialising, rather than giving it over to the hundreds of rat-runners who speed down it every day. If only there were more days like that.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Adrian Day
    • 04 Apr 2019 19:22
    • Traffic count data reveals high incidence of speed...
    • Richard makes a powerful point about making it safe for kids to get to and from our local parks. But of course not every journey made by a kid is to / from a park; not everyone is a kid; and not everyone enjoys the level of nearby parks we benefit from in west PG. What the latest blizzard of road stats does however reveal is that essentially every local street does suffer from occasional-national-speed-limit breaking speeds and a significant minority of vehicles break the streets’ speed limit. Focus on kids and parks by all means but we shouldn’t forget it’s a mere sliver of the overall problem-pie we are all forced to digest, every day, and pretty much all of the time.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 04 Apr 2019 14:33
    • New trains - next week?
    • The best thing about the old trains was the fact that there were no announcements. Everywhere you go these days there is music or some other noise distraction. It was a real tonic that you would have a relatively peaceful trip home. I am now less likely to get a seat as a result of the removal of a good many of them and this is not a good start as my job requires me to stand most of the day. Having said that I am of average height and find the leg room perfectly adequate and the seats comfortable enough.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Victoria Whatling
    • 04 Apr 2019 13:43
    • Sign before 10th April to safeguard the Pinkham Wa...
    • So lots of capacity headroom, a forecast of waste going ever upwards and yet consultants for the London Waste and Recycling Board produce a report to inform the London Plan which envisages a central scenario from a waste prevention strategy reducing total waste levels by 30% over the next 30 years, and 60% if we really go for it. So on one hand its lots of existing capacity and forecasts of ever more waste, on the other a sharp reduction in waste levels being expected from a more sensible approach to waste prevention. Would you go ahead and concrete over those photos of Pinkham Way against that background? (BTW, this is the existing trend of our own waste – LACW being Local Authority Collected Waste.)
    • In Planning and Development / Pinkham Way
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 04 Apr 2019 10:10
    • Traffic count data reveals high incidence of speed...
    • As a child of the 50's I remember quite clearly our leisure regime. We had our tea then rushed on our bikes straight down to the park or rec . Where we played cricket or football. There was always a game on, controlled by the bigger boys of course. We might cycle on the road, but usually the pavement. So what point am I making? It seems very puzzling to me that correspondence and discussion is not focusing on better use of the park. for play. And safe transit from home to the park. Broomfield Park is wonderful. It is enormous. So the issue is making it safe to get to the park - involving crossing Aldermans Hill. In my humble opinion the challenge is to slow traffic on this road, and so into the park. As children we were never supervised. We played perfectly contentedly in the park. And of course if you live a little further from Bloomfield then the playground of choice should be Grovelands. This might lead to a conversation on safety. Parks are way safer than streets . And the more people in them the safer they are. For everybody.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Richard Mapleston
    • 04 Apr 2019 09:46
    • Five years of the Waltham Forest Mini-Holland
    • As someone who lives in Palmers Green and has worked in Walthamstow for many years, I saw the changes being implemented there, and now here. There is no comparison. Waltham Forest Council seems to have a genuine passion for their area, and a clear vision of how the borough can work...for everyone. They grabbed the bull by the horns and just did it, and it’s fantastic. Even where my office is, right in the middle of the industrial part, they’ve pedestrianised some roads, closed others off to through-traffic, created new walkways, implemented one-ways, 20mph speed limits etc. So many more people walk and cycle now, it’s brilliant. It started with them pedestrianising the Village, then rippled out through the rest of the borough. It’s much more sociable, there’s a real sense of community. Well done them!
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Cycle Enfield/Mini-Holland
    • Author Christie Wagland
    • 04 Apr 2019 08:47
    • A105 Experimental Traffic Order A5 leaflet with li...
    • I was told by an Enfield Cabinet member this week that the firm that delivered the 17,000 consultation leaflets uses GPS to track the movement of its employees. They have confirmed that the GPS tracking shows that the distributors went to all the addresses where people have stated that they did not receive the leaflet about the A105 traffic orders consultation. This just strengthens my conviction that people either just threw the leaflets away without reading them or, if they did read them, they then forgot about it. To my mind it's inconceivable that either the council or the firm with the contract to deliver have been lying about delivery of the leaflets.
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Cycle Enfield/Mini-Holland
    • Author Basil Clarke
    • 03 Apr 2019 19:18
    • Sign before 10th April to safeguard the Pinkham Wa...
    • What’s this all about? There’s a complete iceberg of underwater aspects but just looking at some of the easy pickings: North London (that’s us) generates 2.86m tonnes of waste pa (latest figures) It has capacity of 4.42m tonnes to manage it. That’s surplus capacity of 1.6m tonnes pa, or 35%. Enough? North London is also net exporter of waste, so the available capacity should be even higher. But apparently it’s not enough. Equivalent capacity-gap maths recently saw an agreement to a large new incinerator at Edmonton which quickly had the waste authority identifying waste “opportunities” in a 50 mile radius (think eg Oxford and Reading) to fill it up. Then there’s the £1m pa special budget line in the council’s accounts repaying the £60m outstanding loans which are a residue from an earlier Pinkham Way debacle. (That’s roughly this year’s cut in Enfield’s public health grant). It’s also on top of the approximately £40m in various associated costs and professional fees we’ve all met via the authorities cash flow (our Council Tax). But earlier PWA efforts did help drive £900m of savings when the original “procurement “plans for Pinkham Way were...
    • In Planning and Development / Pinkham Way
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 02 Apr 2019 08:40

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