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    • Trains tracked
    • It's bad enough having to put up with unreliable Great Northern services between Palmers Green and London (there were more cancellations today - to make things worse, in blocks of two consecutive trains) but what about the poor b....s who live out in Hertfordshire or Cambridgeshire and can't just get the tube or bus when there are troubles on the line? One such long-suffering commuter is Chenara from Royston (hope I've spelt the name right), but instead of just moaning she's set out to investigate the way the railways work (or sometimes don't) and to pass on her findings in entertaining little doses (one minute each) on her YouTube channel, called Trains Tracked. Here are the first four episodes, with the focus on Govia Thameslink Railway, the company that currently runs Great Northern services: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrKQUMxqjnw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Nk1zhHD_6w https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2_6nQ7nWaU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGyY65j3y5M You can keep track of Chenara and follow the travails of Royston commuters by following her on Twitter: .
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Basil Clarke
    • Yesterday 23:31
    • Trains tracked
    • Thanks for sharing my petition. Just thought it would be worth saying that Govia actually knew it had too few drivers at the start of the franchise, and so did the DfT, but again this is not acceptable, they set them up to fail. London Overground will take over the service, its now just a question of when. The latest it will be is 2021 when the franchise expires, but I'm hoping it will happen by the end of this year, I think it is very much possible that could happen.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Daniel Marrs-Gant
    • 16 Jun 2019 22:18
    • Find out about carnivorous plants in the renovated...
    • Yesterday with a few visiting friends we had coincidentally planned a trip to Kew Gardens and hence the chance to compare and contrast the famous Temperate House with Broomfield Conservatory. The similarities were indeed there for all to see but it was only when looking inside Broomfield that the uncanny resemblance really struck home. On the Kew platform on the way back with its huge TFL map trying to answer a question where PG was to these midlands based friends brought home the nonsense of having an all London transport map to help travellers where a few key lines have been deliberately excluded. Our train service may be bad but a line does exist and is in London, similarly the nearby WGC line. This apartheid really should be brought to and end.
    • In Other Subjects / Parks and Open Spaces
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 16 Jun 2019 20:34
    • Southgate Office Village redevelopment: Online sur...
    • The developers have now submitted a planning application. Go to the and search for 19/01941/FUL. The community view meeting on 22nd June is being facilitated by the national charity Civic Voice, to which Southgate District Civic Trust is affiliated. As part of their preparation Civic Voice created a short survey. Even if you are not planning to attend, it would be extremely useful if you could complete the survey. The more responses received the easier it will be to understand the views of those living and working in Southgate. . The meeting starts at 9.30am and will finish 3pm. No need to stay the whole time, but the longer you do, the more opportunity to feed into the final report. At this meeting Civic Voice will present their report based on the views of community members expressed at the first meeting or in the survey.
    • In Planning and Development / Planning & Development: Miscellaneous subjects
    • Author PGC Webmaster
    • 15 Jun 2019 23:22
    • Trains tracked
    • What Karl seems to be suggesting (and I agree) is renationalisation of the railways. He has graphically illustrated the problems with privatisation - and not just of the railways, the same is happening to the NHS and in several other areas.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Bill Linton
    • 14 Jun 2019 16:21
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • Referring back to Peter Caskey’s contribution yesterday to the debate on this website about the use and misuse of cars on purely residential streets the following points strike me. Firstly I don’t know whether the majority of residents on the Lakes Estate head immediately for the through roads which surround it when they set out on a journey, but I know that I do, and that other people I know also do. I also do my best not to drive to other destinations via residential streets, although on territory new to me I have made mistakes. Secondly I agree with Peter C. that the Lakes Estate streets are lined with cars, and that we can agree that most of them are probably well-used. By contrast Enfield Council’s policy is to encourage car owners to reduce the number of driver-only short journeys they make by walking, or cycling, or using public transport. How well that policy is working I don’t know, but standing and watching cars go by doesn’t convince me that it is. On the other hand I hear of greater use of the cycle lanes so perhaps something is stirring. Thirdly, of course Peter C. had to arrive by van when he was a decorator. Turning now to the cycle lanes I have...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author David Hughes
    • 13 Jun 2019 22:56
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • Chicanes would certainly work to slow down cars, but would have taken away parking spaces, and residents in earlier consultations objected to anything that removed parking spaces. The included road narrowing on some streets - which these were depended I think on earlier feedback from residents of individual streets. However, the dropped the road narrowing because it would take away some parking spaces. The report on the responses to the 2017 consultation is included in . As you'll see if you read it, there was absolutely no consultation about the Fox Lane scheme (just to be sure that this last bit isn't misunderstood, this is sarcasm, in response to complaints at yesterday's FLDRA meeting that the planters idea had come out of the blue with absolutely no consultation).
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Basil Clarke
    • 13 Jun 2019 20:16
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • I’d be very surprised indeed had such engineering not been considered but that the requirements of the emerging London Plan in particular make such “recognised methods” exactly those – the traffic management world we are now leaving, putting the needs of drivers at the bottom of the hierarchy rather than at the top. It’s going to take a while to sink in and then get used to but its happening.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 13 Jun 2019 14:58
    • Trains tracked
    • “Driver problem”? in successfully winning a franchise, and on the basis income is pretty much fixed, the means to promise the best reward is by hitting your cost line. The new train operator will have pretty much the same everything as the old one. That means the only realistic opportunity to save more than the last franchise holder is in that inevitably relatively big cost line of staff and staff related things like training. Tell the awarding body one thing (£), tell the public another (loads of trains, loads of drivers) and then go ahead and reduce (staff) costs as far as possible so as to extract the maximum amount of money possible while trapped punters scream. Repeat same with the next franchisee a few years hence. There’s little suggestion that what we suffer locally is UK-unique in this wealth extraction world of rail travel.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 13 Jun 2019 14:57
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • I don't think any of these issues would have happened if the council had used recognised methods of dealing with the traffic flows using chicanes. This is a link to a standard document which is quite old but is also effectively used in other parts of Enfield. https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20090511035913/http://www.dft.gov.uk/adobepdf/165240/244921/244924/TAL_12-971 The issue for the council however is one of cost. But it would have been less controversial and probably not even commented on in this forum.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Neil Littman
    • 13 Jun 2019 12:12
    • Trains tracked
    • It seems entirely illogical that, not being part of the Overground, we not only have lousy services but also pay more for our journeys when TfL passengers in Hertfordshire (as far out as Cheshunt and Watford Junction) enjoy these benefits! If this decision is largely due to Grayling, then here is yet another politician serving the party rather than the people. Also, what happened to the plan to open up the 'back' entrance to Platform 1 at Palmers Green (from the shuttered entrance between 24 and 26 Alderman's Hill to the right of the station buildings) to allow disabled access? Whose responsibility is that, and can this plan be resuscitated? As for the new trains: I'm no longer a daily commuter but still travel fairly often, and nine times out of ten (literally) it's one of the old trains that comes. Just how many new trains have they actually got? Why is there a driver problem? One wonders if it is not something to do with management and manager-driver relations. Perhaps someone can tell us?
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Garry Humphreys
    • 13 Jun 2019 11:35
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • With 'point no entry' anyone and everyone can use the street and anyone not in a vehicle can enter/exit at either end - but rat-runners won't be able to enter one end and leave the other (the north end of Broomfield Avenue is an example). As with most new residential developments, residents who choose to drive will of course use the road to get to the main roads. Where this has been done elsewhere in the country vehicle numbers/journeys have fallen - as those that can are encouraged to walk, cycle or use public transport. (a large % of car journeys in Enfield are less than one mile). It's a win/win - a healthier, more active population and a quieter, less polluted safer environment for residents. PS the figures in the table show that several roads with planters have experienced increased traffic - which is why they are being removed very soon
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Adrian Day
    • 13 Jun 2019 11:03
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • The thing is David, people who live in the Lakes Estate and surrounding roads drive on other peoples streets, please don't tell me that they immediately drive on to Green lanes etc,. Were I still in my employment as a decorator, it would not be possible to use any other form of transport than my van. Residential streets are for living you say, not driving along. Yet your streets are packed with cars, which I presume are put to use driving along other residential streets. The cycle lanes have caused huge problems on the roads, and made it more difficult for drivers to actually use the main road. It's fine to walk and cycle when it is feasible and possible, but not if you live a distance away from your place of employment.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Peter Caskey
    • 12 Jun 2019 18:54
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • I find it interesting that you say, "Residents vehicles doing a 3 point turn" does that mean only residents are allowed into the street. How do you travel around, do you just stay on the main road, or do you use other routes to reach your destination? Having made the main road narrower, and impossible to pass a stationary bus, I don't know what you expect drivers to do. Do the residents of the roads off Fox Lane etc immediately drive to the main road , or do they use what you call Rat runs too. Just imagine the gridlock if every vehicle that uses those roads were forced on to Green Lanes. By the way, only this week I witnessed a vehicle that could not turn into a Planter obstructed road, drive to a road without a planter and drive along it, so traffic does avoid these roads.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Peter Caskey
    • 12 Jun 2019 18:40
    • Southgate Office Village redevelopment: Online sur...
    • Civic Voice will record the ideas /suggestions/comments expressed by the people attending the event on 22nd June and will prepare a report to be presented to those attending the summary meeting at The Hub, Southgate College, High Street, Southgate N14 6BS between 6.30pm and 8.30pm on Monday 24th June. This is an open meeting and Councillors, MP and planners and the applicant have been invited to attend. SDCT is represented on the Enfield Council Conservation Advisory Group and the views will be presented to that consultation group.
    • In Planning and Development / Planning & Development: Miscellaneous subjects
    • Author Chris Horner
    • 12 Jun 2019 15:11
    • Trains tracked
    • A coordinated single-voice for this £80,000 opportunity seems to make sense. I’m not aware of a PG passenger group so wonder if Fox Lane RA, possibly with the new PG Action Team on operations, makes sense as a unifying body? It seems a good opportunity and worth more than flashier-than-now-wc’s, notice boards and such. Once upon a time the waiting room was used as an art gallery. Perhaps more relevant to the list of provided examples could be to bring to life the oft floated idea of opening up and turning the wilderness behind the wooden fence on Platform 1 into a garden and seating area; a calming space for when the train is delayed / cancelled and at all other times. Using local hands a sum of £80,000 seems large enough to make a serious inroad into such a vision. It’ll be interesting to hear of other suggestions.
    • In Other Subjects / Public Transport
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 12 Jun 2019 14:21
    • Find out about carnivorous plants in the renovated...
    • There’s a very surprising mention in Time Out this week of the “Broomfield Conservatory”. It’s surprising given that magazine’s usual central London and younger age-group focus. It is suggested as an alternate to the Temperate House (Kew Gardens) on a Mayor of London advertorial page. But then we’re let down as visitors are directed to Arnos Grove tube station rather than PG rail. Perhaps that’s because PG doesn’t appear on key TfL / GLA maps (see previous rants on the matter); perhaps an acknowledgement that no one should realistically be pointed to PG’s rail line on a Sunday unless they have a lot of time on their hands; or just maybe the link between Broomfield Park and Arnos Grove (see recent posts on potential boundary changes) is already set in official eyes. Well done the conservatory anyway, a poor show from the GLA / TfL.
    • In Other Subjects / Parks and Open Spaces
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 12 Jun 2019 12:30
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • I'd hazard a guess that that several streets which saw an increase in volume following planter installation would realistically expect a further increase as alternate streets currently offering by-pass facility became harder to negotiate after a planter installation, eg OPP saw an increase post planters; were Grovelands to be planted then a fair assumption would see that as being harder to access and so detrimental to cars which in turn would go to an alternate route, most likely OPR. or so one logic stream might suggest. Has anyone totalled the columns up?
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 12 Jun 2019 12:28
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • I was very struck by Peter Caskey’s bewilderment about the trial of planters on the Lakes Estate to reduce traffic speed/encourage drivers to take a route away from residential streets/use public transport/walk or cycle. As he says people do have to get from A to B, but there are lots of ways of doing it which don’t blight the lives of residents generally and kids especially. Basically car drivers should use main roads rather than residential streets apart from any departure/arrival points which are in residential areas. But of course main roads are generally slow these days especially at peak periods. Which I think is a good incentive to walk, cycle or take public transport. Time now to introduce a good mantra: residential streets are for living, not driving along. On Peter C’s complaint about his Council’s response to a request for reduced speed I have a lot of sympathy. Speeding is antisocial anywhere in town or city, and especially in residential streets where kids should be able to socialize/walk or cycle to school from an early age. But Council’s must be consistent in their decisions. Unfortunately most drivers seem to have acquired a ‘sense of...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author David Hughes
    • 11 Jun 2019 23:29
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • The Councils reaction to Peter Caskey’s request seems to be old world authority thinking in its approach (albeit noting he doesn’t state a “when”). Traffic related injuries to pedestrians on individual residential streets are fortunately rare while car on car bumps tend to converge on junctions but it’s the long assumed low impact of traffic volumes and the “50mph” speeders he mentions which do the incessant damage to local community, public health and the general freedoms of the many. That’s where the Mayors Healthy Streets and the emerging London Plan are centred - and hence Enfield needs to be - and about time too. What still sticks with me is the chart in the original Mini Holland bid which, by memory, showed something like two thirds of all car journeys in Enfield were less than 5km – effectively walking distance. Eat into a slice of that and the volume issue at least all but goes away. Currently that’s a personal choice but is increasingly being “encouraged”.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 11 Jun 2019 09:58
    • Planters in Fox Lane area 'not reducing through tr...
    • The Council's traffic monitoring figures show that the planters haven't moved traffic to other roads - in fact in several roads with planters traffic volume and speed have increased. Experience in other areas show that the only way to deter rat-running traffic (and the associated danger, pollution and noise) from residential streets is to prevent that traffic with physical barriers. I'd much rather that a handful of residents' vehicles do a three-point turn in my street than have the 400 vehicles an hour, many speeding, weaving in and out. Experience elsewhere also shows these measures reduce total amounts of traffic - more people walk and cycle.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Adrian Day
    • 10 Jun 2019 20:58
    • Cycle lanes rage: Time to apply the brakes
    • A couple of points: 1. Reducing the carriageway width has been shown to improve driver behaviour - they drive more carefully and more slowly, thus reducing road danger (see . 2. People cycling in the main part of the carriageway will be doing so because they prefer to go faster than is safe or practical in the cycle lanes. They will be going at a decent speed anyway, and there is absolutely no reason why anyone, other than emergency vehicles, should be doing more than 20mph along the A105. Whole-borough 20mph limits are spreading across London and it's high time Enfield adopted this civilised approach. So in most cases there will be no need to overtake cyclists in the main carriageway. 3. If it is felt necessary to overtake, Rule 163 of the Highway Code states " only when it is safe and legal to do so. You should give motorcyclists, cyclists and horse riders at least as much room as you would when overtaking a car." In practice, on a road with one lane in each direction this means only when there is no oncoming traffic in the other carriageway and the driver should move over onto the other side of the road. So carriageway width is irrelevant. See this image from the...
    • In Traffic, Roads and Parking / Cycle Enfield/Mini-Holland
    • Author Basil Clarke
    • 10 Jun 2019 18:55

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