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    • FLDRA AGM to be asked to adopt position on Fox Lan...
    • Interesting that FLDRA say: " as a result of the feedback received, a decision has been made to make changes to the original design. Further work is now ongoing to develop a revised proposal...This will include a review of the use of ANPR (Auto Number Plate Recognition) in Quieter Neighbourhood projects." FLDRA rejects Enfield Council’s initial Fox Lane LTN proposal (as shown in the exhibition in November 2019). FLDRA continues to support a 20mph limit supported by appropriate traffic calming measures within the Fox Lane area. FLDRA is keen to explore alternative schemes that achieve a safer environment and that take account of the area as a whole, not just certain roads with heavy traffic, with the aim of keeping as many roads open as possible. To this effect FLDRA is engaging with various groups in the neighbourhood and welcomes views from members. Really getting behind David Bird and his ANPR........ has nobody considered what happens if it works? FLDRA just say "There is some dispute with the Council concerning the costs, both capital and running, of ANPR" which rather glosses over the issue - why should the Council, and therefore the rest of the Borough, fund the running...
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author David Eden
    • Yesterday 16:55
    • FLDRA AGM to be asked to adopt position on Fox Lan...
    • I am afraid David Bird's idea of a registration scheme to drive down Fox Lane without being fined really doesn't work. This amounts to a private road. Should we all have private roads? The residents of Fox Lane and the adjacent roads are all free to use the road on which I live, because we pay for roads collectively. What would be the legal position of such a scheme? Would the Council have any legal basis for fining the citizens of Enfield for driving on the roads that they own?
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Michael Hobbs
    • 13 Feb 2020 10:37
    • Stop the Edmonton incinerator
    • The NLWA 'Reducing Residual Waste' scheme which Karl Brown referred to also ties in the Circular Economy (CE) which is naturally emphasised in the London Plan, but was perhaps too inconvenient to be promoted in its natural home, the North London Waste Plan (the NLWP states that it's in favour of it - wow!) CE's effect should be to reduce waste overall and increase recycling. So let's take an area's total waste to be 1 million tons, and the recycling rate @ 30%. We thus have 700,000 tons of residual, and 300,000 tons of recycling. The reduction in overall waste resulting from a middling take-up of CE is c 20%, with perhaps an increase in recycling to 40%. In these circumstances we have 800,000 tons of waste, 320,000 tons of which is recycling. Thus the actual tonnage of recycling hardly changes. But look at the residual waste - this is the feedstock for the new Edmonton plant. That falls from 700,000 tons to 480,000 tons, a fall of more than 30%. That does not make for a stable future for this new plant. And the more that the NLWA has to search outside its own area, the more it goes directly against one of the main NLWP objectives, to reduce 'waste miles' - the distance that...
    • In Planning and Development / Planning & Development: Miscellaneous subjects
    • Author STEPHEN BRICE
    • 13 Feb 2020 08:54
    • FLDRA AGM to be asked to adopt position on Fox Lan...
    • 700 responses is a very large pile, shows a high level of interest, and doubtless diverse views. As a subset of that council response it’s going to be hard for FLDRA to position a truly representative members response (nor why, given the advanced stage of council consultation); but as someone who left when its member-centricity was seen to be compromised when becoming one part of the previous SOGL / local Tory / FERRA anti Mini Holland campaign I have no say. Let's hope that type of non-civic approach is history under fresh leadership. I do see HMG announced yesterday that “dozens of Mini Hollands” are to be introduced across the UK “as part of the programme to create low-traffic neighbourhoods to encourage walking and cycling”. On local ideas being floated, on the basis rat-runners are being assumed to pay for the not-insignificant ANPR infrastructure and ongoing running costs, what happens when it proves successful and they all depart? Who pays then? And if it’s not going to be successful, why is it being floated at all?
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 12 Feb 2020 08:51
    • Spate of thefts from motor vehicles
    • Serious damage caused following an attempted overnight break in to a resident’s work van this week. A Whats App group means all street crime is now broadcast to all, and so while it might be that crime levels haven’t changed since pre- Whats App, certainly the perception on this street is of low / medium level crime being a significant and growing issue. Is that a general PGC view? I was taken along to hear Rory Stewart in his mayoral campaign in Wood Green last week and crime is one of his three main themes (housing and transport being the other two). His proposed rise in the council tax would triple the number of community police, the core of his solution. Ex local Tory stalwart Paul Mandel was also there, telling the hall he’s now a Rory Stewart campaigner. Maybe we could get quadruple coppers locally as a result? Mind you, with about eight attendees in the audience and one leaving early having discovered he was in the wrong place that might be a long shot.
    • In Other Subjects / Crime and Policing
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 12 Feb 2020 08:44
    • FLDRA AGM to be asked to adopt position on Fox Lan...
    • I presume the fldra committee mean 'open' to motor vehicles? Which means 'much less than open' to walkers, cyclists and people using mobility devices. Our street feels most 'open' when part of it is restricted to through traffic as a playstreet and families can cycle safely, people can cross without fear of speeding lorries and people using mobility devices don't have to take their life in their hands to get from one side of the road to other.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Adrian Day
    • 11 Feb 2020 09:35
    • Fox Lane low-traffic neighbourhood meeting: A rang...
    • Disappointed to see the latest Fox Lane Resident's Association newsletter. Whilst it's good the committee's 'position' statement supports a whole area solution to rat-running, the focus seems to be on a 20mph limit, traffic calming and 'keeping roads open' (presumably to through traffic), rather than addressing the concerns residents have about pollution, danger, noise and quality of life. What is FLDRA's vision for an area with around 3000 residents? How do the leadership plan to help those who can to leave their vehicles at home and walk, cycle and use public transport instead? What is their position on climate change? Does FLDRA want a low traffic neighbourhood? Please attend the AGM on Feb 20th at 19.45, Burford Hall, Burford Gardens if you want to be heard.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Adrian Day
    • 10 Feb 2020 16:55
    • A 'dashboard' showing traffic volumes and speeds i...
    • Urban myths never die: somewhere, long ago, I posted a copy of the relevant Cabinet paper showing the contributions to the original spend. None came from Enfield. What happened with any overruns and such I don’t know but TfL build in a hefty contingency element (something like 30% by memory) in funded projects to cover all but the extreme scenario. Worth also adding that all of LBE’s transport related spends (see eg this week’s Cabinet papers on medium term plans and budgets) must align with TFL’s strategy, because they fund it, and as I’ve also pointed out in previous postings, the TfL strategy, aka the Mayors Transport Strategy / London Plan, is very clear in its direction of travel – feet, two wheels, public transport are good, cars however do not get a cheer.
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 10 Feb 2020 14:28
    • A 'dashboard' showing traffic volumes and speeds i...
    • Others have a better handle on the figures than me (Karl, perhaps) but I don't those where the numbers when the scheme started. Enfield only needed to chip in a couple of mill. If mis-management has caused cost over-runs meaning that Council has had to dip into its pockets further then that isn't a problem with the scheme, just typical public sector inefficiency. Might help if useless drivers didn't keep driving into things though......
    • In Planning and Development / Quieter Neighbourhoods
    • Author David Eden
    • 10 Feb 2020 10:21
    • Report calls for government funding to tackle grow...
    • In its , Enfield Voluntary Action (EVA) carries a summary of the poverty report, highlighting sections of the report where voluntary and community sector organisations can make a difference. To follow the links in the summary below, Enfield Poverty & Inequality Commission | All things being equal "The recommendations are a good start to the work of addressing poverty & inequality in our Borough. We will continue to work on more detailed plans and I believe the report provides a framework to enable and strengthen the voluntary sector's long-standing contribution to addressing poverty & inequality in our Borough". Jo Ikhelef, EVA Chief Executive, who sat as a Commissioner. Enfield Poverty and Inequality Commission was chaired over 6 months by Baroness Tyler of Enfield and included Chief Executives from local voluntary sector organisations (Jo Ikhelef from EVA, Chandra Bhatia from EREC, Jill Harrison from Citizen's Advice, Pamela Burke from Enfield Carers Centre, Monty Meth from Enfield Borough over 50s Forum). The Commission reviewed evidence, listened to stakeholders, and took testimony from local residents, focusing on living, learning & earning in our Borough. The...
    • In Other Subjects / Miscellaneous
    • Author PGC Webmaster
    • 10 Feb 2020 00:53
    • Stop the Edmonton incinerator
    • “Heads should roll”, said an ex NLWA board member and Enfield Conservative leader in the local press after the last waste authority (NLWA) fiasco costing us ratepayers tens of millions of pounds. They didn’t, and the same heads then went on to develop a case for the Edmonton incinerator. Whether committing to incineration is the sensible route for the next 30-50 years in these climate emergency times is one debate (the core issue for the Chingford based “Stop the Incinerator” campaign; also XR); the other being my own early stage involvement saying that even on their own highly-inflationary manipulated data, building for 700,000 tonnes pa was still about 300,000 tpa too much. Because it was indeed too large, the intent rapidly moved to capture commercial waste in north London (not a waste stream in the remit of the NLWA, or in the original plan), then also commercial waste in a 50 mile radius of the plant. But commercial waste levels have a high recycling rate that’s getting better (north of 70%), which means less residual waste to burn and so back to a gap to fill 700,000 tpa. As charts on earlier postings show, household waste levels are actually falling rather...
    • In Planning and Development / Planning & Development: Miscellaneous subjects
    • Author Karl Brown
    • 09 Feb 2020 17:54

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