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Articles about the plans for a cycle lane network throughout Enfield (the "Mini-Holland" scheme).

There is also a Cycle Enfield-Mini Holland category in the discussion forums


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 pg to edmonton quietway screenshotClick on the image to enlargeEnfield Council is planning to create a cycle quietway to provide a safer route between Palmers Green and Edmonton.  The scheme also includes measures to improve pedestrian safety in the Hoppers Road area.

Quietway Link 02 will connect the Palmers Green end of Hoppers Road with the Haselbury area of Edmonton, providing links to the cycle track along the A10 Great Cambridge Road and another quietway between Haselbury and Edmonton Green.  The route will run via Barrowell Green and Firs Farm Park.

Measures to improve the safety of cyclists and pedestrians include:

  • footway buildouts (incorporating rain gardens) in Hoppers Road and Stonard Road to reduce road width
  • a continuous footway across the junction of Hoppers Road and Stonard Road
  • a ban on parking on the corners of Stonard Road, Avondale Road, Meadowcroft Road, Eaton Park Road and Lytton Avenue
  • cycle-friendly road humps to reduce vehicle speeds along Barrowell Green
  • widening of the pavement where Barrowell Green runs alongside the playing fields to create a pedestrian/cyclist shared space (this stretch of Barrowell Green is little used by pedestrians but is hazardous for cyclists because of the bend in the road)
  • a new raised pedestrian/cyclist crossing across Firs Lane.

Between Firs Lane and the A10 the route uses the new path across Firs Farm Park (lighting will be provided to allow its use at night).  Cyclists will be able to use the underpass beneath the Great Cambridge Road.  The route continues via Deansway towards Quietway Link 03 on Haselbury Road, which provides a link to Edmonton Green.

The council is inviting residents to comment on its plans.  Residents' views will be used to help shape the design for the scheme before a formal consultation is carried out later this year.  Details of the proposals and a form for submitting comments can be found on the Cycle Enfield website under the title "Firs Lane Neighbourhood.  The deadline for comments is 5 August.

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Karl Brown's Avatar
Karl Brown posted a reply #3976 17 Jul 2018 23:49
That’s my walking route of choice when heading in that direction – but they’ll need to remove the no-cycling signs from the A10 underpass. Looking forward to an equivalent PG to Southgate safe route, which will mitigate the current Fox Lane cycling nightmare.
Basil Clarke's Avatar
Basil Clarke posted a reply #3977 18 Jul 2018 00:50

Karl Brown wrote: That’s my walking route of choice when heading in that direction – but they’ll need to remove the no-cycling signs from the A10 underpass. Looking forward to an equivalent PG to Southgate safe route, which will mitigate the current Fox Lane cycling nightmare.


Yes, a safe route to Southgate is essential. I would suggest two routes that would both link up to the Hoppers Road - Edmonton scheme. A direct route with cycle lanes along Bourne Hill and The Bourne (the road is pretty wide) and a Quietway which would go along Woodland Way (or Hillfield Park), Woodcroft, Grovelands Park, Wynchgate, Raleigh Way and Winchmore Hill Road.
Emma Knight's Avatar
Emma Knight posted a reply #4045 12 Sep 2018 10:26
What is meant by footway build outs on Hoppers Road? It is already congested with parking on both sides, the school and the bus route. If the road is narrowed any further it will be awful. I can't find the consultation on the Enfield.gov website, so if anyone can give me a link I'd be grateful.
Basil Clarke's Avatar
Basil Clarke posted a reply #4046 12 Sep 2018 17:00


The final consultation phase (statutory consultation) starts today and closes on 7th October. The new link is www.consultatio...ion/intro/ though the consultation is badly named, as it affects much more than just Firs Lane.

There is also a statutory consultation about a quiet route through the Haselbury Road area - there have been some changes to the original proposals. See www.consultatio...ion/intro/

The pavement build outs are intended to make Hoppers Road less "awful" for people on foot and on bikes so as to provide a safer route from Hoppers Road to Firs Farm and Great Cambridge Road.

Congestion is caused by there being too many cars on the road and by on-street parking manoeuvres. You can't get rid of it by widening roads or building new roads - they just fill up and cause more congestion further on. In any case, there is only single-file traffic along Hoppers Road. And the fact that there is a school along there makes it all the more important to reduce the amount of traffic using the road and to stop speeding cars.
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David Hughes posted a reply #4048 12 Sep 2018 17:49
I wonder if the appropriate response to Emma Knight's contribution on 12 September is: "Awful for whom?". Residents, walkers, cyclists, drivers, all of them?

Whilst I haven't undertaken a detailed analysis of the proposals, or even kept up with the general thrust of the Council's plans, I wonder whether the aim, other than to create a Quietway to Edmonton, is to discourage through traffic (primarily on behalf of residents) since it runs parallel with Green Lanes (A105) which these days is itself less than congenial for short, driver-only journeys. After all, Enfield Council seems to have joined the ranks of councils encouraging walking and cycling.

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nice guidance coverUpdated guidance published by the UK's top authority on improving health and social care calls on local authorities to prioritise walking, cycling and public transport over private cars.  Recommended measures include re-allocating road space by widening pavements and installing cycle lanes, closing roads and reducing vehicle speeds.

The fact that the Cycle Enfield and Quieter Neighbourhood programmes are designed to do just that is no coincidence.  Over the last few years Government at both national and local levels has  been becoming increasingly aware of the importance of active travel for physical and mental health, of the obstacles in the way of active travel and of the negative impact of excessive use of private cars. Which is why both the previous and the current Mayor of London have made funds available for councils to start to implement such policies and why the London Borough of Enfield - with cross-party support - developed its bid for "Mini-Holland" money.

So Enfield Council has not - as some people claim - embarked on an irrational scheme of no benefit to the wider community.  It is literally following doctors' orders.

Comprehensive evidence base

The updated version of NICE guideline NG90 - Physical Activity and the Environment - was published on 22nd March by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (formerly the National Institute for Clinical Excellence).

The detailed guidance on the NICE website is supported by a comprehensive evidence base and supplemented by a set of tools and resources for use by local authorities. Setting the scene, the guidance points out that

"In 2015/16, more than a quarter of adults in England were classified as inactive (fewer than 30 minutes physical activity a week). Increasing physical activity can prevent over 20 serious health conditions, including cancers, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity."

The guidance quotes an estimate of the cost of physical inactivity to wider society in the UK as around £7.4 billion a year:

Key facts and figures

Physical activity can help people to prevent and manage over 20 chronic health conditions (Start active, stay active Department of Health). The benefits of physical activity vary across ages and include improvements to physical and mental development and functioning. (Start active, stay active: infographics on physical activityDepartment of Health).

Physical inactivity costs the NHS in the UK around £1 billion per year (Making the case for public health interventions The King's Fund; The economic burden of ill health due to diet, physical inactivity, smoking, alcohol and obesity in the UK: an update to 2006-07 NHS costs Scarborough et al. 2011). lncluding costs to wider society, this rises to around £7.4 billion a year (Everybody active, every day: an evidence based approach to physical activity Public Health England).

Souce: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng90/chapter/Context

Give active travel the highest priority

NICE call on local authorities to aim to make it as easy as possible for people to walk, cycle or use other forms of active travel rather than making short journeys by car to travel between home and railway stations, workplaces, schools and colleges, shops and leisure facilities. Part of the guidance on active travel is shown below.

Extract from the section on Active Travel from NICE guideline NG90

 Ensure pedestrians, cyclists and users of other modes of transport that involve physical activity are given the highest priority when developing or maintaining streets and roads. (This includes people with limited mobility.) Use one or more of the following methods:

Source: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng90/chapter/Recommendations#active-travel

As well as making recommendations about roads and travel modes, the NICE guidance covers::

  • enhancing the accessibility, quality and appeal to users of local open spaces to increase their use
  • designing buildings in such as way as to encourage use of stairs rather than lifts
  • provide accessible walking and cycling routes between buildings on campus sites (eg universities or hospitals)
  • encouraging physical activity at schools.

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thank you for the bike lanesOn Sunday families came out in their scores to celebrate the inauguration of the cycle lanes connecting Palmers Green to Enfield Town along the A105.

thank you for the bike lanesThe assembled riders say Thank you for the bike lanes (Click on photo to enlarge)

More than 200 people assembled outside Coffee Break in Winchmore Hill, ready to set off on a varied selection of bikes - some their own, others lent out without charge by Urbo.  There were bikes large and small - tandems, cargo bikes, bikes with carriages for kids, a tricycle for disabled riders from Bush Hill Park.

a105 cycle lanes riders gather in palmers greenSome of the PG contingent gather before setting off for Winchmore Hill (Photo: Phil Rogers)

Riders too came in various shapes, sizes and ages.  They included a 5-year-old who managed the whole distance from Palmers Green to Enfield and octogenarian David Hughes, provider of our regular series Cycling in Enfield - the View from the Saddle.  Enfield Council Leader Doug Taylor got on his bike too, along with several more councillors and Enfield Southgate MP Bambos Charalambous.

Guest of honour was Will Norman, the Mayor of London's Walking and Cycling Commissioner, who told the assembled riders that Sadiq Khan was a firm supporter of Cycle Enfield. He added, "This family ride has been a great way to show how these car-dominated roads have been transformed into safe and welcoming streets for cyclists and pedestrians of all ages. The improvements that have been made to the roads of Enfield are a wonderful example of what can be achieved, and exactly what we’d like to see right across the capital.”

But the heroes of the day were Councillor Daniel Anderson, Cabinet Member for the Environment and Clare Rogers, one of the founder members of Better Streets for Enfield.  Although the Cycle Enfield proposals had been drawn up with support from both sides of Enfield Council, Cllr Anderson found himself faced with some very vociferous opposition to any measures that might in any way inconvenience car drivers,  not just from the Save Our Green Lanes campaign, but also from the Conservative group on the Council.  Better Streets for Enfield was set up in response to the campaign against the cycle lanes, bringing together people from across the borough who share the ambition of bringing back people-friendly streets to Enfield and giving the lie to to the claim that "no-one" supported the cycle lanes.

clare rogers and daughters a105 cycle lanes ride 2A very happy Clare Rogers with daughter, friends and their bikes and the tulips for presenting to Cllr Anderson

And in recognition of his persistence in providing safe cycling along Green Lanes despite the naysayers, Better Streets presented Cllr Anderson with a bouquet of tulips (from Holland, presumably, but actually purchased from Pomegranate on Aldermans Hill) and a bottle of award winning sparkling wine from Enfield's own organic vineyard at Forty Hall Farm.  The flowers were presented by two little girls who had arrived in a cargo bike.  Their mother celebrated with a tweet:

kids on bikes a105 cycle lanes"We are grateful for the cycle lanes – because they have given a once-hostile road back to our kids."

Speaking on behalf of Better Streets, Clare Rogers said thank you to Enfield Council:  "Not just thank you from us as campaigners, but on behalf of the one group of people who haven’t been to any public meetings or filled in consultations or written angry letters to the local press. These people will be affected by the scheme more than any other, but they have had virtually no say whatsoever. They are,  of course, our children. We are grateful for the cycle lanes – because they have given a once-hostile road back to our kids."

imageChris Chinnery demonstrates a tricycle from the Inclusive Cycling sessions held on Tuesday to Friday mornings in Bush Hill Park

As I've said, there were bikes of various types at the event, but perhaps the most interesting is the trike ridden by Chris Chinnery.  It's one of an amazing line-up of special bikes and trikes that disabled people are able to use during the Inclusive Cycling sessions in Bush Hill Park on Tuesday to Friday mornings.

There are a lot more photographs on Facebook and Twitter - see the links below.

Links

What a day! Celebrating the A105 (Better Streets for Enfield)

Enfield’s new cycle route showcased on Mother’s Day (Council website)

Cycle Enfield on Twitter

Better Streets for Enfield on Twitter

Photos of the ride on Facebook (146 pictures on Cycle Enfield page)

More photos! (on the Better Streets for Enfield Facebook page)

This article was amended on 15 March 2018 to correct the captions to two photographs and add information about Inclusive Cycling.

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David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3710 15 Mar 2018 12:17
Wish I could have made this. Love the pics, kids & oldies being the most heart warming - hopefully they'll all start to use the lanes more now too, further put pay to the pathetic anti-cycling rhetoric seen around social media.

Well done all involved!
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PGC Webmaster posted a reply #3714 15 Mar 2018 16:16
I've corrected a couple of photo captions and added information about the Inclusive Cycling sessions in Bush Hill Park, which you can read about at cycleenfield.co...e-cycling/ . See also the video below.


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Better Streets for Enfield and Cycle Enfield are jointly hosting a celebratory ride along the newly completed bike lanes between Enfield Town and Palmers Green.

Riders will assemble outside Capitol House in Winchmore Hill at 2pm on 11th March.

Ride the A105!

On the afternoon of Sunday 11 March  we’re gathering to ride the new cycle lanes along the A105!

start of a105 bike rideMeet here in Winchmore Hill at 2pm on Sunday 11 March

Come one and all, whether you cycle every day or haven’t ridden a bike for 40 years – this will be an easy, family-friendly ride. We are joining with Cycle Enfield who are providing cycle instructors and marshals. (And it’s Mother’s Day, so bring your mum!)

Ride any kind of bike or trike you like. Decorate yourself, your bike or both – balloons, bells, windmills, fancy dress all encouraged – and celebrate the transformation of this road and its town centres along the route.

Time and start place: 2pm outside Capitol House / Coffee Break in Winchmore Hill, 794 Green Lanes, N21 3RB (see image above from Google).

Don’t have a bike? No problem – Enfield’s new dockless hire bikes will be available! Download the Urbo app first – see www.myurbo.com.

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Jason Gill, Reader, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow and Carlos Celis-Morales, Research Associate, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow

Research has consistently shown that people who are less physically active are both more likely to develop health problems like heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and to die younger. Yet there is increasing evidence that physical activity levels are on the decline.

The problem is that when there are many demands on our time, many people find prioritising exercise difficult. One answer is to multi-task by cycling or walking to work. We’ve just completed the largest ever study into how this affects your health.

Published in the British Medical Journal today, the results for cycling in particular have important implications. They suggest that councils and governments need to make it a top priority to encourage as many commuters to get on their bikes as possible.

The findings

Cycling or walking to work, sometimes referred to as active commuting, is not very common in the UK. Only 3 per cent of commuters cycle to work and 11 per cent walk, one of the lowest rates in Europe. At the other end of the scale, 43 per cent of the Dutch and 30 per cent of Danes cycle daily.

urban cycling IIICycling to work - associated with a 41% lower risk of dying
Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
To get a better understanding of what the UK could be missing, we looked at 263,450 people with an average age of 53 who were either in paid employment or self-employed, and didn’t always work at home. Participants were asked whether they usually travelled to work by car, public transport, walking, cycling or a combination.

We then grouped our commuters into five categories: non-active (car/public transport); walking only; cycling (including some who also walked); mixed-mode walking (walking plus non-active); and mixed-mode cycling (cycling plus non-active, including some who also walked).

We followed people for around five years, counting the incidences of heart disease, cancers and death. Importantly, we adjusted for other health influences including sex, age, deprivation, ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, other types of physical activity, time spent sitting down and diet. Any potential differences in risk associated with road accidents is also accounted for in our analysis, while we excluded participants who had heart disease or cancer already.

We found that cycling to work was associated with a 41 per cent lower risk of dying overall compared to commuting by car or public transport. Cycle commuters had a 52 per cent lower risk of dying from heart disease and a 40 per cent lower risk of dying from cancer. They also had 46 per cent lower risk of developing heart disease and a 45 per cent lower risk of developing cancer at all.

Walking to work was not associated with a lower risk of dying from all causes. Walkers did, however, have a 27 per cent lower risk of heart disease and a 36 per cent lower risk of dying from it.

The mixed-mode cyclists enjoyed a 24 per cent lower risk of death from all causes, a 32 per cent lower risk of developing cancer and a 36 per cent lower risk of dying from cancer. They did not have a significantly lower risk of heart disease, however, while mixed-mode walkers did not have a significantly lower risk of any of the health outcomes we analysed.

For both cyclists and walkers, there was a trend for a greater lowering of risk in those who commuted longer distances. In addition, those who cycled part of the way to work still saw benefits – this is important as many people live too far from work to cycle the entire distance.

As for walkers, the fact that their health benefits were more modest may be related to distance, since they commute fewer miles on average in the UK – six per week compared to 30 for cyclists. They may therefore need to walk longer distances to elicit meaningful benefits. Equally, however, it may be that the lower benefits from walking are related to the fact that it’s a less intense activity.

What now?

Our work builds on the evidence from previous studies in a number of important ways. Our quarter of a million participants was larger than all previous studies combined, which enabled us to show the associations between cycling/walking to work and health outcomes more clearly than before.

In particular, the findings resolve previous uncertainties about the association with cancer, and also with heart attacks and related fatalities. We also had enough participants to separately evaluate cycling, walking and mixed-mode commuting for the first time, which helped us confirm that cycling to work is more beneficial than walking.

In addition, much of the previous research was undertaken in places like China and the Nordic countries where cycling to work is common and the supporting infrastructure is good. We now know that the same benefits apply in a country where active commuting is not part of the established culture.

It is important to stress that while we did our best to eliminate other potential factors which might influence the findings, it is never possible to do this completely. This means we cannot conclusively say active commuting is the cause of the health outcomes that we measured. Nevertheless, the findings suggest policymakers can make a big difference to public health by encouraging cycling to work in particular. And we should not forget other benefits such as reducing congestion and motor emissions.

Some countries are well ahead of the UK in encouraging cyclists. In Copenhagen and Amsterdam, for instance, people cycle because it is the easiest way to get around town.

It was not always this way – both cities pursued clear strategies to improve cycle infrastructure first. Ways to achieve this include increasing provision for cycle lanes, city bike hire schemes, subsidised bike purchase schemes, secure cycle parking and more facilities for bicycles on public transport.

For the UK and other countries that have lagged behind, the new findings suggest there is a clear opportunity. If decision makers are bold enough to rise to the challenge, the long-term benefits are potentially transformative.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

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David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3564 22 Jan 2018 09:57
The evidence continues to mount......pity it's so low on Khan's priority list.

There was a huge report last year (maybe year before) about how active travel could literally save the NHS due to the massive reduction improvements in health, fitness, weight loss etc would cause vis a vis treating obesity, heart disease, diabetes and other weight related health issues.

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David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3541 15 Jan 2018 15:33
Felt bad for WH police. Honest and innocent posting for a genuine and fair intended purpose. However totally failed to guage anti-cycle propaganda hate campaigning and the inevitable backlash from drivers.
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Karl Brown posted a reply #3542 15 Jan 2018 16:30
David - for non Twitter types (like me) could you fill the gaps to explain what you mean please. Seems reasonable Police guidance; eg I wouldn't expect my nephew, who has cycled Edinburgh to London in 48 hrs, to be other than outpacing cars on the main carriageway.
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David Eden posted a reply #3543 15 Jan 2018 16:43
No problem. I agree it's sensible advice from WHP. I think what they were trying to get ahead of was angry sentiment from cars users who sometimes see cyclists not using cycle lanes and often complain about it (especially controversial high-cost projects like EMH). WHP were making it clear that cyclists do not HAVE to use cycle lanes. Projects like EMH are for the convenience of all cyclists but most specifically designed for less confident cyclists, those who wouldn't otherwise get out on a bike, such as the elderly or children etc, it gives them a safe zone to pootle along in.

More confident cyclists (which they refer to as fast and on expensive bikes, perhaps accurate but not the most helpful descriptors) are sometimes called 'vehicular cyclists' and don't mind the more fast paced aggressive cycling required to filter in with vehicular traffic. For them, slowing down for designated junction crossings, bus stop by passes and the occassional wistful pedestrian, is an inconvenience they are happy to avoid.


However, fuelled by tabloid press (Times as well as Daily Mail type rags) and things like the Briggs Campaign, 2017 demonstrated a massive backlash against cycling and cyclists in particular. Any post mentioning it on social media is inevitably met by a barrage of cyclist-abusing posters, normally complaining about road tax, red light jumping and what a danger cyclists are and that they need mandatory licencing registration and taxation to curb this (isn't exactly working well for cars!).

And that's what happened here. Well-meaning post met with a barrage of anti-cyclist abuse.

Personally I love EMH, it's the only proper cycle infrastructure I get in 10 miles of commuting, so I enjoy using it irrespective of being a confident moderately fast vehicular cyclist.
Karl Brown's Avatar
Karl Brown posted a reply #3544 15 Jan 2018 17:30
I’m shocked. You say the police give out general advice and information on personal safety, somewhat focused on the safety of children and the less able, often older, community members and they get a tsunami of abuse?
David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3545 16 Jan 2018 09:17
I wouldn't say they get the abuse specifically. The focus/subject of it is cycling, however its delivered in response to a sensible and well meaning tweet from the police force.
Tristan Lockheart's Avatar
Tristan Lockheart posted a reply #3558 20 Jan 2018 20:08
I understand where they are coming from. An immense amount of funds was spent on the project, and I suppose it is rather galling to see very few cyclists along Green Lanes, and fewer still actually using the cycle lanes which have caused (and still cause) disruption to our journeys (along with costing rate-payers indirectly). I suppose it is a feeling that the investment we have put into the scheme (both financial and temporal) is being wasted due to low use and a refusal to use the expensive infrastructure installed.
David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3562 22 Jan 2018 09:53
Tristan - who and what do you mean by 'rate payers'? Funds came from TfL, ring-fenced for active travel infra, therefore have not cost Enfield and have not opportunity costs vis a vis other spending in the borough. Equally business rates for commercial premises along EMH have been unchanged (one of SOGL complaints) therefore there has been no impact on Council revenues.

I see cyclists using EMH every time I'm on it, though I appreciate the name may seem a misnomer as uptake is not on Dutch levels.

I've suffered no disruptions personally. Partly because I guess I've been lucky when in the car, and partly because for short local journies I leave the car at home and use EMH - pootling along past all the traffic caused by people in cars who choose not to do the same.
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David Hughes posted a reply #3570 22 Jan 2018 22:50
It's politely and softly said, but there is an underlying criticism in Tristan Lockheart's most recent contribution to this thread which I think ignores far too much.

First a bit of history. The UK lost its cycling culture during my lifetime of 80 years, mainly in the first 30/40 years. Before then boys learned the cycling skills from older boys in the street outside their homes; few girls/women cycled. Most male manual workers cycled to work - in my town anyway - some boys cycled to school. No child turned up at the schools I went to in a car. Some came and went by train or bus.

At just over five years old I walked to school supervised by the ‘big girls’, who were around eight or nine years old. From about 10years old I cycled alone.

But of course there were virtually no cars due to the war and the legacy of war.

I told that story partly because it highlights the freedoms children have lost, but could be brought back in purely residential streets if drivers behaved. Why do does anyone other than the fire service have to drive above 15kph in a street designed for living and access? These are ideal places to learn/develop cycling skills.

Whether that sort of freedom can return or not, bringing a cycling culture back is going to take much time. There will be no surge on the Green Lanes cycle lanes for a long time. Why? Because changing a mindset is a slow business: decisions will have to be made to buy bikes, and it’s hard to find time to help kids learn. Fitting seats on parents’ bikes for kids below cycling age will not come easily to the modern mind, nor the willingness to put a youngster in a trolley behind your bike in Netherlands and Denmark style (probably Sweden, Norway & others as well though I haven’t been there for some years). Plus the fact that ours will be rather difficult cycle lanes to cope with until walkers get the hang of staying on the pavement (not as difficult as some of Strasbourg’s though, and it has an excellent cycling culture) .

Meanwhile there is still the 'pull' of that comfy car; especially when it's snowing as yesterday, or raining hard, or windy, or hot. Fair enough if weather is really bad, but when I lived in a village and cycled 12 kilometres each way to work I several times made it to the office when cars couldn't get through the drifts. Which is not to suggest that people go that far, but is to say that there seems to be mindset now which sees biking as impossible. Not so except when there’s much traffic, and drivers are in ‘entitlement’ mode. Which most usually are, because until now government at every level has fostered cars over common sense.

Now that vexed issue of experienced, often commuting, cyclists who are continuing to cycle on the carriageway. Of course they will! Some of our cycle lanes are on the pavement, are not as direct or smooth as the carriageway (which if you got an expensive bike is a nuisance), and there will probably be jay-walking pedestrians on cycle lanes along the social centres such as high streets. Further there seem to be more delaying traffic lights though I haven’t counted.

For the moment I'm mostly sticking to the cycle lanes, partly to assess their qualities and partly to be part of the pedestrian reminder system; some pedestrians seem genuinely amazed at my presence. However, it's likely that I'll ultimately revert to the carriageway. It's quicker, and I can play my part in undermining the 'sense of entitlement' so many drivers have: everything should be organised to suit my needs. Here’s a few examples:

• pedestrians required to walk out of their way to cross the road on a zebra crossing;
• giving children's independence on residential streets is not my problem;
• rat-running is OK even if it does limit children’s’ freedoms;
• parking selfishly, and
• travelling alone in large cars over short distances..

Tristan started with this sentence: "I understand where they are coming from. An immense amount of funds was spent on the project...............". Not an immense amount by comparison with the money spent over the years on systems for traffic; often making traffic safer for pedestrians. And had London remained mainly a walking, cycling, public transport culture it’s probable that only a smidgen of that money would have been needed.

If a walking culture been retained public transport could have carried the extra customers relatively comfortably; cars need an awful lot of room per person, especially when driver-only.

Finally there is the question of health. By now just about everyone knows about the dire effects of poor air quality (though drivers go on driving), but lack of fitness is also a serious problem accompanied by its soul mate: Type 2 diabetes.

Meanwhile cycling is wonderful for old geezers like me because it is excellent exercise, and it’s so easy on creaking hips and knees.

Just for the record I have a car. I/we, my wife and me, use for journeys were the big three can’t help.

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Consultations are currently under way for four minor proposals that form part of the Cycle Enfield scheme:

  • A short section of cycle track at the junction of Bury Street West and Church Street designed to provide a safe link between the main A105 cycle lanes and the new Quietway running alongside the Salmons Brook (deadline for responses 12th November)
  • Bike hangars in three locations (deadline for responses 13th November).

Bury Street West/Church Street

The proposal is to provide a segregated cycle track along the north side of Church Street from Bush Hill Parade as far as the junction with Blakesware Gardens.  The cycle route would then run along Blakesware Garden without any segregation or markings before turning right into Little Bury Street and joining the new cycle/foot path along the Salmons Brook.

Where the cycle track crosses the end of Bury Street West there would be a raised junction with a central island.  The width of the mouth of Bury Street West would be reduced from 30 metres to 9 metres, making it much easier for pedestrians to cross safely.

BURY STREET WEST JUNCTION WITH CHURCH STREET – JUNCTION IMPROVEMENTS
bury street west cycle improvementsThe measures being introduced at this junction include, reducing the width of the junction, building out the existing footway, a raised entry treatment and the continuation of the cycle track from the A105 major scheme. An informal pedestrian crossing with a central traffic island is also being introduced. The junction crossing distance will be reduced below 9m compared to the existing 30m. This will bring significant improvements for pedestrians.

CYCLE TRACK
A 2.5m wide two-way cycle track will continue on from the A105 major scheme at Church Street and take cyclists to and from Blakesware Gardens via a small area of shared footway at the corner of the junction.

PUBLIC REALM IMPROVEMENTS
As part of this scheme we intend to plant two new trees on the section of Church Street footway between Greggs and Lords DIY. We also intend to site a new bench in this area as well as some cycle parking stands.

SALMONS BROOK
The cycle route will then continue along Salmons Brook then across the A10 using a new toucan crossing, through Churchfield Recreation Ground and on to Edmonton Green.

RAIN GARDENS
Rain gardens are a type of Sustainable Drainage feature (or SuDS), which mimics natural drainage. They can provide additional benefits to conventional pipes and gullies such as: Biodiversity– plants can sustain a variety of wildlife such as butterflies and bees. Water quality– rainwater from the road currently drains into gullies and straight into Salmons Brook, rain gardens filter out pollutants from the road before rainwater enters the stream. Flood risk– the rain gardens help alleviate pressure on the existing piped system by allowing rain water to naturally soak into the ground. Air quality– plants are known to reduce the amount of pollution in the air. Aesthetic– plants can add more colour to the street.

Bike hangars

bike hanger exampleBike hangars are designed to store cycles securely.  Users pay an annual fee to rent a space.  The hangars are bolted to the road and the roof open up towards the pavement.

The proposed locations are Tottenhall Road, Russell Road and Hazelwood Lane - all in the N13 postal district - and are a response to requests from residents.

Links

Cycle Enfield Consultation Hub (with links to pages with full details of each proposal)

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David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3280 30 Oct 2017 09:43
Never been a fan of that Bush Hill Rd/A105/Church street junction (as a cyclist who loves & supports Enfield Mini Holland). Anything to improve access and usability gets my vote!

Wonder when the A406-Palmerston Road/Crescent consultation results will be released....?

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As part of the Cycle Enfield works, Green Lanes will be closed between Hedge Lane and Hazelwood Lane overnight for four nights, commencing on Tuesday 29th August.  The closures will be from 8pm to 6am and will allow resurfacing of the main carriageway.  The noisiest work will be carried out up to midnight.  There will be no access to Green Lanes from Osborne Road, Windsor Road, Park Avenue and Fox Lane during the overnight closures.

The eventual layout of this stretch of Green Lanes is shown in the drawings below.

fox lane junctionFox Lane junction - click on the plan to enlarge

hedge lane junctionGreen Lanes/Hedge Lane/Bourne Hill junction - click on the plan to enlarge

This article was amended on 17th August to correct the starting date for the road closures.

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Bill Linton's Avatar
Bill Linton posted a reply #3158 17 Aug 2017 09:57
Where's the 329 going to go? My guess would be A406 eastbound, then Hedge lane, but does anybody know?
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PGC Webmaster posted a reply #3165 17 Aug 2017 22:32
Apologies, but I mistyped the date that the Hedge Lane to Hazelwood Lane closure is due to begin. It's 29th August, not 19th.

Before that, for five nights beginning on 21st August, there will be closures further to the north, I think probably between Hedge Lane and Highfield Road. The 329 and N29 will be diverted between 8pm and 5am and won't serve any stops between Hedge Lane and the "Church Street" bus stop (ie Village Road/Bush Hill Parade). The diversion will run along Hedge Lane, Great Cambridge Road and Church Street non-stop.

Tnanks tp Donald Smith for this information.
Tristan Lockheart's Avatar
Tristan Lockheart posted a reply #3346 19 Nov 2017 14:49
The 329 and N29 will be diverted between 8pm and 5am and won't serve any stops between Hedge Lane and the "Church Street" bus stop (ie Village Road/Bush Hill Parade). The diversion will run along Hedge Lane, Great Cambridge Road and Church Street non-stop.

Tnanks tp Donald Smith for this information.[/quote]
I would question this, given that TfL policy is that buses should stop on diversions at bus stops (where they exist) or treat the section as Hail and Ride. I think that this should be looked into.

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Palmers Green Triangle after projected Cycle Enfield worksArtist's impression of Palmers Green Triangle after completion of Cycle Enfield works

Work to reconfigure the Palmers Green Triangle area in line with the Cycle Enfield project is due to start in five days time, when the clock will be removed and placed in storage. The actual roadworks will commence a week later, on 17th July.  The bottom part of Aldermans Hill (between Devonshire Road and Green Lanes) will be closed to vehicles approximately three months.

Notice of the closure is included in a letter delivered to addresses in the vicinity.  The letter goes on to say that "Devonshire Road will remain open to vehicles during this time, diversion routes will be displayed on signposts at the junction".  However, there is no information about where the diversion routes will go.

triangle layoutPalmers Green Triangle - click on the plan for a larger version

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David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #3078 06 Jul 2017 11:43
From a cyclists point of view these look a great improvement. Dividing north and south turning traffic either side of the triangle rather than having to swing right onto Green Lanes like present - which is always congested by parked cars. Nice big cycle boxes too always feel much safer at the front of lines of traffic than tucking in alongside or poking out in front.

Not 100% sure how southbound Green Lanes traffic turns onto Alderman's Hill though??
Colin Younger's Avatar
Colin Younger posted a reply #3082 06 Jul 2017 17:04
It’s not clear to me what the impact on local roads will be of this closure, particularly if the junctions of Green Lanes and Fox Lane and with Broomfield Lane are still being worked on.
The notice in the Enfield Gazette (page 36) gives the diversions as:
Southbound; Green Lanes, Bourne Hill, The Bourne, High St N14, Cannon Hill, Aldermans Hill.
Northbound: Green Lanes, North Circular, Powys Lane, Aldermans Hill.
The note hand delivered locally from the London Highway Alliance says that Devonshire Road will remain open.
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PGC Webmaster posted a reply #3086 12 Jul 2017 14:30
While the Triangle end of Aldermans Hill is closed (17 July to 7 October) buses will be diverted as follows:

121
The 121 will not serve any of its normal stops in Green Lanes north of the North Circular or any stops in Aldermans Hill. It will instead be diverted along Bowes Road and Wilmer Way, rejoining its normal route in Cannon Hill.

W6
Towards Edmonton the W6 after the Broomfield Park stop the W6 will be diverted along Grovelands Road, Burford Gardens and Bourne Hill, rejoining its normal route in Hedge Lane. It will not serve the stops at Palmers Green Station, Lodge Drive, Fox Lane or Bourne Hill.
Towards Southgate the W6 will run via Bourne Hill, Caversham Avenue and Old Park Road. It will not serve the following stops: Bourne Hill, Fox Lane, Lodge Drive, Palmers Green Station.

(Thanks to Donald Smith for providing this information)
Colin Younger's Avatar
Colin Younger posted a reply #3091 13 Jul 2017 22:14
What about the 329? There's a notice at the Aldermans Hill/Powys Lane junction (seen driving north) directing the 329 down Aldermans Hill. This implies a Green Lanes closure south of the Triangle, but directs it down to the closed Triangle unless it too will use the Lakes estate rat runs. Perhaps Devonshire Road..... Obviously there must be more information about this apparent conundrum.
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PGC Webmaster posted a reply #3092 13 Jul 2017 22:40

Colin Younger wrote: What about the 329? There's a notice at the Aldermans Hill/Powys Lane junction (seen driving north) directing the 329 down Aldermans Hill. This implies a Green Lanes closure south of the Triangle, but directs it down to the closed Triangle unless it too will use the Lakes estate rat runs. Perhaps Devonshire Road..... Obviously there must be more information about this apparent conundrum.


The 329 diversions are overnight (starting at 9pm) this week, when they will be resurfacing the Green Lanes/Broomfield Lane/Oakthorpe Road junction. The 121 will be also be affected and will run via the North Circ and Wilmer Way. The 329 won't be affected by the Triangle work, which starts on the 17th.

This week overnight northbound cars along Green Lanes are being diverted via Ecclesbourne Gardens, Oakthorpe Road, Riverway, The Grove and Lodge Drive.
Bill Linton's Avatar
Bill Linton posted a reply #3094 17 Jul 2017 22:40
Does anyone know, now that the W6 is diverted along Grovelands and Burford, whether one can just hail them as they pass, or do I need to trek either to the Broomfield Park stop or the top of Hedge Lane?
PGC Webmaster's Avatar
PGC Webmaster posted a reply #3103 22 Jul 2017 00:58

Bill Linton wrote: Does anyone know, now that the W6 is diverted along Grovelands and Burford, whether one can just hail them as they pass, or do I need to trek either to the Broomfield Park stop or the top of Hedge Lane?


Unfortunately, there is no hail and ride on the W6 diversion route. The hail and ride stops at the top of Hedge Lane and the "Broomfield Park" stops on Aldermans Hill are in use, but the bus won't stop anywhere in between.

Donald Smith suggests complaining to TfL - 0343 222 1234 option 6.
Bill Linton's Avatar
Bill Linton posted a reply #3104 22 Jul 2017 11:55
I successfully hailed one at the Fox Lane/Grovelands junction on Wednesday morning, and got let off at the Fox Lane/Caversham junction on the way back.

It would be quite odd if a route with hail and ride sections elsewhere didn't permit hailing on such a long stopless section.

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A105 Scheme

Green Dragon Lane to York Road –The zebra crossing is now complete and has been reopened.

Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove – The final section of line marking and cycle segregation units has been installed. The rain garden outside St Stephen’s has been installed and further work will continue to replace the raised flower beds and other landscaping work. Our lighting contractor Bouygues are scheduled to install the new crossing adjacent to Regency Court later this week. Work to install signs and posts will start next week.

Sainsbury’s Junction – The traffic signals will be  commissioned by Transport for London as all electrical connections are now complete. Work is expected to be complete by the mid-May.

Station Road Junction – Work on this section is nearing completion with final work on the cycle lane and lane marking taking place. Work will start on the construction of two brick planters and work on a vehicle crossover outside 4-6 Station Road will start this week. Partner companies Siemens and Bouygues will be installing traffic signals and completing street lighting. The work on this section is scheduled to be complete by mid May 2017.

Church Street Junction with Bush Hill Road – The street lighting, cycle paths, pavements and rain gardens have been completed. The installation of street furniture including cycle stands will start this week.

Bush Hill to Essex Road – Work to install new drainage and kerbs has now been completed in two sections and we will start to work on the Uvedale Road northbound section this week under three-way off-peak traffic lights. Work is expected to be complete by August.

Ecclesbourne to Oakthorpe Road - Work is continuing on Palmerston Crescent northbound working north. We will be working on the installation of kerbs, concrete slabs and drainage.  Next week we will swap to the opposite side of the road and start work there. The planned road closure of Broomfield Lane has been rescheduled to start in the week commencing 8 May.

Lodge Drive to Osborne Road –  We will be working between Bourne Hill/Hedge Lane and Fox Lane roundabout in order to install the new cycle path. We will also be installing drainage, paving, signalling and a new bus boarder. More parking spaces have been made available for business customers in this area. The construction of a new bus boarder stop has also started. Work on the Fox Lane junction will start next week under multi-phased street lights. Work on this section is scheduled to be completed by late May 2017.

Lodge Drive Car Park - The surfacing, line marking and lighting upgrade works were all completed last week and the car park was opened on the Friday afternoon.

Radcliffe Road to Riverbank – We are installing a new kerb line, cycle lane and paving as well as improving drainage and constructing rain gardens. The work on this section is scheduled to be completed by mid June 2017.

Oaktree Avenue to Highfield Road – Work to complete a further bus stop near Fernleigh Road continues. We will soon be installing the Fernleigh Road raised junction. Temporary pedestrian signals will remain place until the new crossing is commissioned.

Ponders End scheme

High Street – The northern section between Eagle House Car Park and Stonehorse Road will be constructed in the first half of the calendar year. The southern section between Stonehorse Road and Clarence Road will be built in the second half of the calendar year. The challenging reconfiguration of the Derby Road junction is being planned for the summer holiday period to minimise disruption.

Queensway - Associated works are planned for Queensway to improve pedestrian access to the new school. The work to improve the footways and add a zebra crossing started earlier this month. This section is not expected to affect the wider traffic network.

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Below is a brief description of the progress of work in each of the area we are currently working. It is not an exhaustive list and may be subject to change due to adverse weather conditions.

A105 Scheme

Green Dragon Lane to York Road –The zebra crossing is now complete and has been reopened.

Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove – The final section of line marking and cycle segregation units will be installed in the coming week. The bus shelter outside the church has been removed and the new one installed awaiting electrical connection. Three shared parking bays are also currently being constructed and will be completed next week.

Green Dragon Lane to York Road –The zebra crossing is now complete and has been reopened.

Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove – The final section of line marking and cycle segregation units will be installed in the coming week. The bus shelter outside the church has been removed and the new one installed awaiting electrical connection. Three shared parking bays are also currently being constructed and will be completed next week.

Green Dragon Lane to York Road –The zebra crossing is now complete and has been reopened.

Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove – The final section of line marking and cycle segregation units will be installed in the coming week. The bus shelter outside the church has been removed and the new one installed awaiting electrical connection. Three shared parking bays are also currently being constructed and will be completed next week.

Sainsbury’s Junction – The traffic signals at the junction have been installed and are awaiting final commissioning by Transport for London which is currently scheduled for 28 April. 11 May. Work is expected to be complete by the mid-May.

Station Road Junction – The traffic signals are awaiting final commissioning by Transport for London which is currently scheduled for 11 May. Work is continuing with lane marking, kerb lines and paving slabs. Three central islands have been installed and will be completed in the coming week. Work will continue on the installation of kerb lines, paving work and cycle lane. The work on this section is scheduled to be complete by mid May 2017.

Church Street Junction with Bush Hill Road – We are currently constructing additional footpath area behind the bus stops. We will soon be installing a rain garden.

Most new street lighting has now been commissioned. Work on this section is expected to be complete by late April.

Lodge Drive to Osborne Road –  We will be working between Bourne Hill/Hedge Lane and Fox Lane roundabout in order to install the new cycle path. We will also be installing drainage, paving, signalling and a new bus boarder. More parking spaces have been made available for business customers in this area. The construction of a new bus boarder stop will start next week. Work on this section is scheduled to be completed by late May 2017.

Radcliffe Road to Riverbank – We are installing a new kerb line, cycle lane and paving as well as improving drainage and constructing rain gardens. The work on this section is scheduled to be completed by mid June 2017.

Oaktree Avenue to Highfield Road – Work to complete a further bus stop near Fernleigh Road continues. Temporary pedestrian signals will remain place until the new crossing is commissioned.

Bush Hill to Essex Road – Work will continue to install new drainage and we will start to build the cycle lane. Work is expected to be complete by August.

Ecclesbourne to Oakthorpe Road - Work is continuing on Palmerston Crescent northbound working north. We will be working on the installation of kerbs, concrete slabs and drainage.  In order to carry out work safely, Broomfield Lane will be closed from Monday 24 April for four weeks.

Ponders End scheme

High Street – The northern section between Eagle House Car Park and Stonehorse Road will be constructed in the first half of the calendar year. The southern section between Stonehorse Road and Clarence Road will be built in the second half of the calendar year. The challenging reconfiguration of the Derby Road junction is being planned for the summer holiday period to minimise disruption.

Queensway - Associated works are planned for Queensway to improve pedestrian access to the new school. The work to improve the footways and add a zebra crossing started earlier this month. This section is not expected to affect the wider traffic network.

To see the work schedules for all projects including those not yet started please visit our Construction page.

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Below is a brief description of the progress of work in each of the area we are currently working. It is not an exhaustive list and may be subject to change due to adverse weather conditions.

A105 Scheme

Green Dragon Lane to York Road –The zebra crossing is now complete and has been reopened.

Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove – We will continue to install cycle segregation units until early April. Line marking will continue this week. The bus shelter outside the church will be replaced at a later date by Transport for London. Work is expected to be complete by the mid April.

Sainsbury’s Junction – The traffic signals at the junction have been installed and are awaiting the completion of the power supply. Lane markings and cycle segregation units have been installed. Work is expected to be complete by the mid-May.

Station Road Junction – Work will continue on the installation of kerb lines, paving work and cycle lane. The three central islands have now been installed. The work on this section is scheduled to be complete by mid May 2017.

Church Street Junction with Bush Hill Road – Work on both bus stops has now been completed as has the surfacing and line marking. We are currently constructing additional footpath area behind the bus stops. We will soon be installing a rain garden.

Most new street lighting has now been commissioned. Work on this section is expected to be complete by late April.

Lodge Drive to Osborne Road –  We will be working between Bourne Hill/Hedge Lane and Fox Lane roundabout in order to install the new cycle path. We will also be installing drainage, paving and signalling. More parking spaces have been made available for business customers in this area. The construction of a new bus boarder stop will start next week.Work on this section is scheduled to be completed by late May 2017.

Radcliffe Road to Riverbank – We are installing a new kerb line, cycle lane and paving from April 18 as well as improving drainage and constructing rain gardens. The work on this section is scheduled to be completed by mid June 2017.

Oaktree Avenue to Highfield Road – Work to replace paving slabs and to create the cycle lane will take place over the next week. Work on the construction of two new bus shelters is now complete with work starting on a further stop near Fernleigh Road. Temporary pedestrian signals will remain place until the new crossing is commissioned. Work is expected to be complete by the end of April.

Bush Hill to Essex Road – Work will continue to install new drainage and we will start to build the cycle lane. Work in this area is expected to be completed in May.

Ecclesbourne to Oakthorpe Road - Work is continuing on Palmerston Crescent northbound working north. We will be working on the installation of kerbs, concrete slabs and drainage.  In order to carry out work safely, Broomfield Lane will be closed for six weeks.

We will shortly start the decommissioning of the traffic signals which will mean the installation of temporary lights at the Broomfield Lane junction.

Ponders End scheme

High Street – The northern section between Eagle House Car Park and Stonehorse Road will be constructed in the first half of the calendar year. The southern section between Stonehorse Road and Clarence Road will be built in the second half of the calendar year. The challenging reconfiguration of the Derby Road junction is being planned for the summer holiday period to minimise disruption.

Queensway - Associated works are planned for Queensway to improve pedestrian access to the new school. The work to improve the footways and add a zebra crossing started earlier this month. This section is not expected to affect the wider traffic network.

To see the work schedules for all projects including those not yet started please visit our Construction page.

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A105 Scheme

Green Dragon Lane to York Road - Most substantive work on this section is complete. The zebra crossing has now been connected and the associated road marking work will take place next week.

Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove - We will continue to install cycle segregation units until early April. Line marking will continue this week. The bus shelter outside the church will be replaced at a later date by Transport for London. Work is expected to be complete by the mid April.

Sainsbury's Junction - The traffic signals at the junction have been installed and are awaiting the completion of the power supply. Lane markings have been completed. Cycle segregation units will be installed by the end of April. Work is expected to be complete by the mid-May.

Station Road Junction - Work will continue on the installation of kerb lines, paving work and cycle lane. We are also installing three central islands. Surfacing work will take place from Monday 10 April for four nights under a road closure between 8pm and 5am. The work on this section is scheduled to be complete by mid May 2017.

Church Street Junction with Bush Hill Road - We have completed the construction of the bus stop outside 90 Ridge Avenue and will be constructing the footpath area behind this. We are currently working on the bus stop outside the park which is due to be completed next week. Most new street lighting has now been commissioned. Work on this section is expected to be complete by late April.

Lodge Drive to Osborne Road -  We will be working between Bourne Hill/Hedge Lane and Fox Lane roundabout in order to install the new cycle path. We will also be installing drainage, paving and signalling. More parking spaces have been made available for business customers in this area. Work on this section is scheduled to be completed by late May 2017.

Radcliffe Road to Riverbank - We are installing a new kerb line and cycle lane as well as improving drainage. The work on this section is scheduled to be completed by mid June 2017.

Oaktree Avenue to Highfield Road - Work to replace paving slabs and to create the cycle lane will take place over the next week. Work on the construction of two new bus shelters is now complete with work starting on a further stop near Fernleigh Road. Temporary pedestrian signals will remain place until the new crossing is commissioned. Work is expected to be complete by the end of April.

Ponders End scheme

End High Street - Work on the High Street is anticipated to start in early April 2017. The northern section between Eagle House Car Park and Stonehorse Road will be constructed in the first half of the calendar year. The southern section between Stonehorse Road and Clarence Road will be built in the second half of the calendar year. The challenging reconfiguration of the Derby Road junction is being planned for the summer holiday period to minimise disruption.
 
Queensway - Associated works are planned for Queensway to improve pedestrian access to the new school. The work to improve the footways and add a zebra crossing started earlier this month. This section is not expected to affect the wider traffic network.

To see the work schedules for all projects including those not yet started please visit our Construction Page.

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Ringway Jacobs have sent the following letter to Palmers Green residents and business owners.

Dear Resident / Business Owner,

This letter is to inform you of work in your area as part of the Cycle Enfield project and the associated complimentary measures.

Work to increase the number of parking bays within the Lodge Drive car park is due to take place from Monday the 6th of March until the end of April 2017.  Work will take place primarily between 7am and 6pm Monday to Friday.

Once the work is complete, the car park will be more efficient and presentable, more vehicles will be able to use it and customers will be able to park for free for 45 minutes in a designated number of bays only, which will be clearly marked and signed.  During the work vehicles will still be able to use the car park although the number of available parking bays will be reduced.

During the first half of April, the car park will be closed to all vehicles for 1 week.  This will allow us to carry out all necessary resurfacing work within the car park.  More information will be published closer to the time.

We will publish regular updates on construction (including details of future work) in partnership with Enfield Council, via the Cycle Enfield website: www.cycleenfield.co.uk/construction .  Alternatively, you can receive the latest information from Cycle Enfield's newsletter.  To subscribe go to http://cycleenfield.co.uk/  and complete the form at the bottom of the page.

More information on the overall A105 project including detailed drawings for the scheme is available at www.cycleenfield.co.uk/A105

Ringway Jacobs Ltd will make every effort to keep disruption to a minimum. We would ask you to take note of any parking restrictions that may be in place.

Should you require more information on any matters relating to construction, please
e-mail   or call 020 7536 3655.

We would like to thank you in advance for your patience and understanding while work is ongoing.

Yours faithfully,

Rilwan Oshingbade

Dear Resident / Business Owner,

This letter is to inform you of work in your area as part of the Cycle Enfield project and the associated complimentary measures.

 

Work to increase the number of parking bays within the Lodge Drive car park is due to take place from Monday the 6th of March until the end of April 2017.  Work will take place primarily between 7am and 6pm Monday to Friday.

 

Once the work is complete, the car park will be more efficient and presentable, more vehicles will be able to use it and customers will be able to park for free for 45 minutes in a designated number of bays only, which will be clearly marked and signed.  During the work vehicles will still be able to use the car park although the number of available parking bays will be reduced.

 

During the first half of April, the car park will be closed to all vehicles for 1 week.  This will allow us to carry out all necessary resurfacing work within the car park.  More information will be published closer to the time.

 

We will publish regular updates on construction (including details of future work) in partnership with Enfield Council, via the Cycle Enfield website: www.cycleenfield.co.uk/construction .  Alternatively, you can receive the latest information from Cycle Enfield’s newsletter.  To subscribe go to http://cycleenfield.co.uk/ and complete the form at the bottom of the page.

 

More information on the overall A105 project including detailed drawings for the scheme is available at www.cycleenfield.co.uk/A105 

 

Ringway Jacobs Ltd will make every effort to keep disruption to a minimum.

We would ask you to take note of any parking restrictions that may be in place.

 

Should you require more information on any matters relating to construction, please

e-mail or call 0207 536 3655.

 

We would like to thank you in advance for your patience and understanding while work is ongoing.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

 

Rilwan Oshingbade

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PGC Webmaster's Avatar
PGC Webmaster posted a reply #2985 17 Apr 2017 22:52
The complete closure of the Lodge Drive car park mentioned in our report dated 10th March is scheduled for Tuesday 18th April until Saturday 22nd April (weather permitting).

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A105 Scheme

Green Dragon Lane to York Road – Most substantive work on this section is complete. A zebra crossing will be commissioned next week.
 
Borden Avenue to Walnut Grove – We have removed and replaced a bus shelter and completed the drainage. Some additional surfacing and lining work will take place during daytime hours.

Work is expected to be complete by the end of March.

Sainsbury’s Junction – We will be working on the traffic signals at the junction.

Work is expected to be complete by the end of March.

Station Road Junction – Work has started on the installation of kerb lines, paving work and vital drainage engineering. In addition, work has started on the cycle lane, as well as to introduce some new green space.

The work on this section is scheduled to be complete by late May 2017.
 
Church Street junction with Bush Hill Road - We are renewing pavement slabs and rebuilding parking bays on Church Street. We will be constructing bus stop boarders as well as finishing kerbing and paving work. Over the next two week we will be installing the cables for traffic signals and installing lamp posts. Resurfacing is due to start in the week commencing April 3.

Work on this section is expected to be complete by mid April.

Lodge Drive to Osborne Road –  We will be working between Bourne Hill/Hedge Lane and Fox Lane roundabout in order to install new kerb lines. We will also be installing drainage, paving and signalling.

Work on this section is scheduled to be completed by late May 2017.

Radcliffe Road to Riverbank – We are installing a new kerb line and cycle lane as well as improving drainage.

The work on this section is scheduled to be completed by mid June 2017.

Oaktree Avenue to Highfield Road – Work to replace paving slabs will take place over the next week. We will also be working on the construction of the new bus stop and cycle lane.

Bush Hill to Essex Road – Work to remove the lamp columns and the island on which they stand will start near the Majestic Wine warehouse. Once this is completed work will start to build the cycle lane.

Work in this area is expected to be completed in May.

Ecclesbourne to Oakthorpe Road - Investigation work to start paving, the installation of kerbs and bus stop boarder will be taking place.

Ponders End scheme

End High Street – Work on the High Street is anticipated to start in late March 2017. The northern section between Eagle House Car Park and Stonehorse Road will be constructed in the first half of the calendar year. The southern section between Stonehorse Road and Clarence Road will be built in the second half of the calendar year. The challenging reconfiguration of the Derby Road junction is being planned for the summer holiday period to minimise disruption.
 
Queensway - Associated works are planned for Queensway to improve pedestrian access to the new school. The work to improve the footways and add a zebra crossing will start in early March 2017. This section is not expected to affect the wider traffic network.

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Paul Mandel's Avatar
Paul Mandel posted a reply #2900 24 Mar 2017 00:05
Earlier this evening I witnessed a 329 bus travelling southbound on the A105 immediately north of its junction with the B154 deliberately overtake a line of four stationary vehicles, waiting at the temporary red lights where there is currently a three way traffic control necessitated by Enfield Council's mini-Holland construction work

The bus driver then proceeded through the red light and narrowly avoided colliding with a W8 (?) bus turning right out of the B154 and onto the A105.

Obviously one bus driver at least, in need of re-training, but clearly already fed up with Mini Holland’s maxi-mayhem, this could have had devastating results.

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Enfield Council has published the following information about parking along the A105 for disabled people.

Disabled parking on the A105 scheme

We are aware concerns were raised over the cycle lane reducing the availability of parking spaces and preventing people with disabilities transported by private vehicles gaining access in certain areas. We also understand the concerns that the cycle lane could restrict the dial-a-ride from operating at locations such as the Ruth Winston Centre.

We would like to address these concerns and clarify that any Blue Badge holder will be able to set down and pick up passengers along the route, even if that means temporarily entering the cycle lane to position their vehicle by the kerb edge. This will also apply for dial-a-ride buses operating in Enfield. We would also like to highlight the proposals for disabled parking summarised below. All Blue Badge holders will be able to:

  • Park free of charge in on-street Pay and Display bays along the route, including high street areas in Palmers Green and Winchmore Hill, for up to three hours
  • Park free of charge in both the reconfigured Lodge Drive car park and Fords Grove car park
  • Park for up to three hours on both double and single yellow lines at side road junctions, providing there are no loading restrictions in operation at the time. These restrictions will be trialled so that they can be amended based on usage and feedback
  • Designated bays for Blue Badge holders will be provided in the locations specified below on a trial basis so that they can be reviewed and amended based on demand and feedback. These bays will be provided in the following general locations:
    • London Road, south of Roseneath Walk
    • Village Road (not A105) by St Stephen’s Church
    • A105 near to Vicars Moor Lane junction
    • A105 close to Shrubbery Gardens junction, by Post Office
    • Station Road near to its junction with Green Lanes
    • Compton Road near to junction with The Broadway
    • A105 near to Woodberry Avenue
    • A105 near to Gillian House Surgery
    • Hazelwood Lane, near to Green Lanes
    • Lodge Drive, near to Green Lanes
  • Along the residential length of the cycle lane, there will be breaks in the lanes to provide areas for shortterm loading/unloading. These areas will have double yellow lines to prevent parking, but will be able to be used by Blue Badge holders to park for up to three hours outside peak periods (7am-10am and 3pm-7pm).

These restrictions will be trialled and may be amended based on usage and feedback.

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