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Fox Lane LTN Group members have been leafleting streets in the area. Their flyer includes their suggestion for an alternative scheme.

People living in Fox Lane and surrounding streets are welcoming Enfield Council’s idea of closing roads to create low-traffic neighbourhood (LTN) throughout the area and are calling on other residents to voice their support.

Joining together as the Fox Lane low traffic neighbourhood (LTN) group, residents from 13 streets in the area say they are pleased that active steps are being taken to cut down on speeding vehicles and rat runners so that everyone can more readily walk and cycle around the neighbourhood.

Old Park Road

ibrar and family

Resident Ibrar says: “As a parent of two children under 5 years old, we worry for their safety. Data recorded by Enfield Council show that we have cars travelling at motorway speeds on our road, and up to 3000 car journeys per day’. Something needs to be done to make our road safe and enjoyable and for this reason I fully support the proposals to create a quieter neighbourhood and stop rat running”.

"Tens of thousands of vehicles use these back streets as a shortcut every day"

Commenting on the plans, Adrian Day, spokesperson for the Fox Lane LTN group says: “For too long drivers have been using these residential roads as a cut through with recorded speeds regularly over 60mph. Tens of thousands of vehicles use these back streets as a shortcut every day. This traffic should be kept on the main roads where it belongs, so that people feel safe on the roads they live and are happy to walk and cycle. We’re delighted that the Council is bringing forward plans to tackle this issue properly.

Cranley Gardens

Resident Sarah says her daughters tried to cycle to school along the Mall (which gets over 4,000 vehicles a day) after they had completed their primary school Bikeability training. “An SUV driver nearly knocked one of my girls off her bike. They never did it again. Taking the through traffic off Fox Lane and the Mall would open up these roads for families to enjoy walking and cycling the school run.”

Campaigning for more than 30 years

The issue of heavy and speeding traffic is not new. Some residents have been campaigning about traffic problems in the area for more than thirty years. The Fox Lane "Quieter Neighbourhood" was first consulted on four years ago, and many residents have been calling for a low traffic neighbourhood ever since. The planters trial earlier in 2019 – narrowing the entrance to each road with a large planter – failed to reduce traffic or speed.

Meadway

ben and family

Resident Ben has two children aged 5 and 2. He says, “Meadway is a residential road that bears the same volume and speed of traffic as most main roads. A low traffic neighbourhood would have an enormously positive impact on our family life; at the moment it feels dangerous to cross the road or walk around the neighbourhood with children on scooters. The thought of cycling around the Fox Lane area as a family is inconceivable. A small change in driving habit and route would make our roads friendlier, healthier and safer for generations to come.”

Complaints backed up by council data

The group's complaints about heavy traffic are supported by automatic traffic count data collected by Enfield Council in late 2018 and published in summary form by Palmers Green Community earlier this year. The worst roads included Meadway - where more than 29,000 vehicles were detected over the week the monitoring was carried out; the Mall - nearly 24,000 vehicles over the week; and Fox Lane itself, with 42,000 recorded vehicles.

As an example of the problem the group points out that people living in Amberley Road, a short residential street with just 50 households, had to put up with more than 4,300 cars on the busiest day and around 27,000 over the week. It is clear, they say, that the majority of these journeys are through traffic rather than resident car journeys.

Grovelands Road

Resident and father of two Paul says: “Fox Lane is part of the route to my childrens’ primary school. Walking there is not a pleasant experience with cars speeding and being worried about crossing roads. I’d like the option of cycling up Fox Lane but at the moment that's not possible. I'd like a quieter neighbourhood to stop the rat running and the speeding boy racers..”

Agreeing with the principle, but not every detail of the plans

The Fox Lane LTN group do not agree with every detail of the Council's plans and many members would like fewer closures than proposed. However, all are in agreement of the principle of an area-wide plan to close rat runs and hope sticking points will be ironed out during the trial. The group is encouraging all residents to share their views with the Council about what they think will work.

"Dramatic improvements in air quality and daily exercise"

Adrian Day continues: “Enfield Council has declared a climate emergency. Reducing the volume of traffic in the area will improve air quality and help more people consider walking and cycling and rely less on their cars for short journeys. This will in turn improve residents’ health. The same approach in Waltham Forest produced dramatic improvements in air quality and daily exercise among residents – and showed that the surrounding road network can cope with changes to vehicle journeys. Hackney has had similar schemes for decades and low traffic neighbourhoods are now being proposed by several boroughs across London. As Enfield looks to roll out low traffic neighbourhoods across the borough it is great that we are able to play our role in finding out what works best.”

To support the Fox Lane area residents or find out more, contact them on .

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wesley ashwell's Avatar
wesley ashwell posted a reply #5034 13 Dec 2019 12:30
A large majority of residents in this area, myself included - as opposed to the
"people living in Fox Lane and surrounding streets" are totally opposed to the
LTN stance expressed above. The so-called traffic problems as described by them(and Enfield Council, some members of which, I suspect , may have ulterior motives) have been hugely exaggerated.

Yes ,the earlier planters scheme was a disaster, and rightly so. And what has been the official response? A needlessly extreme and undemocratic attempt to impose a grossly inappropriate and unwieldy 'quieter streets' scheme, which would be a nightmare for the majority of residents in the pursuit of their normal daily lives.

A much simpler, saner and more acceptable solution would be the establishment of a 20 mph limit throughout the area and the introduction of speed bumps on some critical roads. Job done.
roger dougall's Avatar
roger dougall posted a reply #5035 13 Dec 2019 13:48
Well said Ashley. This page has been created to try to create the illusion that more people support it than actually do because they feel threatened and overwhelmed by the intense opposition .
I don't see an equivalent page for residents coming together to oppose the LTN plan.Thats because they know it would be a massive own goal.
Speed bumps are a good idea but a load of false objections around the issue are presented because in reality they just want to close the roads completely with no compromise.
If there is one thing the council should learn from the Northen general election results its that if you keep ignoring the voices of the majority you will get voted out.
I suspect other motives are at play to try and force this through.Much like the fake consultation for the failed Green Lanes project.
David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #5036 13 Dec 2019 15:03

wesley ashwell wrote: LTN stance expressed above. The so-called traffic problems as described by them(and Enfield Council, some members of which, I suspect , may have ulterior motives) have been hugely exaggerated.

A much simpler, saner and more acceptable solution would be the establishment of a 20 mph limit throughout the area and the introduction of speed bumps on some critical roads. Job done.


What are these "ulterior [sic] motives" you speak of...??

And you do know there's a 30mph limit already, right? And people still drive at 40,50,60mph. So what good would a 20mph limit do?
David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #5037 13 Dec 2019 15:04

roger dougall wrote: Much like the fake consultation for the failed Green Lanes project.


Ok Donald Trump....
Adrian Day's Avatar
Adrian Day posted a reply #5038 13 Dec 2019 15:19
Wesley - what evidence do you have for claiming a 'large majority'?
Around 3000 rat running vehicles down my residential street, Old Park Road, each day at speeds of up to 60mph is a real traffic problem - we could just block our street but the quieter streets would soon know about it as traffic displaces, so we favour a 'whole neighbourhood' solution.
Not 'job done' - 20mph and speed humps don't stop rat runners.
It's a nightmare now for cyclists, walkers and residents - the LTN will improve things.
And finally it's a trial.
Adrian Day's Avatar
Adrian Day posted a reply #5039 13 Dec 2019 15:22
Roger - David Burrows campaigned against the LTN trial with a desperate last minute door drop. Whilst clearly not the only factor, he lost and his share of vote fell further than Bambos's (Bambos supports the principle of an LTN). Burrows tried the same trick with the A105 Cycle Lanes and that also failed badly.
David Eden's Avatar
David Eden posted a reply #5040 13 Dec 2019 15:25
And didn't a Winchmore Hill Tory candidate campaign specifically on the back of anti-green lanes cycle scheme and failed miserably too??
Alex Lyness's Avatar
Alex Lyness posted a reply #5041 13 Dec 2019 15:49
Take a trip to Tower Hamlets to see the ineffectiveness of 20mph limits. In Tower Hamlets the council rolled out 20 mph limits all over the borough to improve safety. Whilst a proportion of people stick to the 20 mph limits, you see huge numbers of people who just ignore it. More worryingly, in my experience it has driven lots of people to start doing stupid things like overtaking people on residential roads who are sticking to the limit because they’re too impatient to follow a 20 mph limit.

Given the speeds I see down our road (which has humps already) I struggle to see how implementing 20mph limits will drive any actual change in behaviour.

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